2.endo

2.endo - Endocrine physiology 1 Outline 1) Hormones: the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
HKin 191 Endocrine physiology 1 Outline 1) Hormones: the basics 2) Hormones: types and mechanisms 3) Endocrine organs (covered in course) • hypothalamus • anterior and posterior pituitary • the adrenal glands • pancreas • kidney
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
HKin 191 Endocrine physiology 2 Key concepts: Hormones vs. nerves as communication systems Types of hormones: structural and functional definitions How hormone structure affects mode of action Why hormones need receptors to work How the same hormone can cause different responses How the nervous and endocrine systems are integrated
Background image of page 2
HKin 191 Endocrine physiology 3 neural system endocrine system body Control systems growth and development response adaptation require communication maintenance of homeostasis reproduction
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
HKin 191 Endocrine physiology 4 1) Hormones: the basics Mediators Targets Range Duration Speed of action Characteristic All types of cells muscle, glandular, and neural cells Hormones Neurotransmitters Systemic but regulated Local Long (seconds - days) Short (milliseconds) Slow (seconds - days) Fast (milliseconds) Hormonal control Neural control
Background image of page 4
HKin 191 Endocrine physiology 5 2) Hormones: types and mechanisms • four “functional” types i) ii) iii) circulating hormones iv) local hormones
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
HKin 191 Endocrine physiology 6 1) Paracrine: cell-to-cell communication (local hormone) Cardiomyocyte β 1 -adrenergic receptor e.g. movement of epinephrine across a synapse
Background image of page 6
HKin 191 Endocrine physiology 7 2) Autocrine: intra-cell communication (local) antigens Il-2 (from helper T-cells) antigen presenting cell e.g. T-cell activation and proliferation activated T-cells T-cell proliferative T-cells for example only: you are not responsible for this material
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
HKin 191 Endocrine physiology 8 3) Neurocrine: nerve mediated hormonal communication e.g. antidiuretic hormone (ADH) hypothalamus b posterior pituitary gland b bloodstream neurocrine endocrine
Background image of page 8
HKin 191 Endocrine physiology 9 4) Endocrine: intercellular communication (circulatory) e.g. atrial nateuretic factor released from atria in response to more stretch ANF binds to kidney receptors b B in urine production b reduce stretch ANF
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
HKin 191 Endocrine physiology 10 Hormones: types and mechanisms (see table 18.2) Two basic “chemical” families • amine hormones e.g. epinephrine • peptide hormones e.g . ANF • eicosanoid hormones e.g . leukotrienes • steroid hormones e.g . cortisol • thyroid hormones e.g . T3 • nitric oxide (NO) subtypes subtypes
Background image of page 10