Chapter22 - Structures of the Respiratory System Function...

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Structures of the Respiratory System Function of the Respiratory System – Exchange of gases between the atmosphere and the blood Respiratory system divided into two main parts – Upper respiratory system Collects air, filters contaminants from the air, and delivers it to the lower respiratory organs – Lower respiratory system
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Respiratory System Structures of the Upper Respiratory System, Sinuses, and Ears – Components of the upper respiratory system Nose – external portion of the respiratory system Nasal cavity – lined with hairs and a ciliated mucous membrane to filter and trap particles and microbes Pharynx – lined with a ciliated mucous membrane that pushes contaminants into the digestive system Tonsils – aggregations of lymphoid tissue Mucus – contains antimicrobial chemicals
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Respiratory System Structures of the Lower Respiratory System – Components of the lower respiratory system Larynx – contains the vocal cords Trachea, bronchi, bronchioles – series of tubes that allow movement of air through to the lungs Alveoli – Air sacs of the lungs where oxygen from air enters the blood while carbon dioxide diffuses from the blood into the alveoli to be exhaled Diaphragm – muscle involved in breathing • Protective components include a ciliated mucous membrane, alveolar macrophages, and secretory antibodies
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Structures of the Respiratory System
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Respiratory System Normal Microbiota of the Respiratory System – Lower respiratory system • Typically microorganisms are not present – Upper respiratory system • Normal microbiota limit growth of pathogens • Normal microbiota may be opportunistic pathogens • Examples of normal microbiota Haemophilus influenzae can colonize the nose Staphylococcus aureus is present as normal microbiota in some individuals without causing disease – Diphtheroids can colonize the nose and nasal cavity
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Bacterial Diseases of the Upper Respiratory System, Sinuses, and Ears Streptococcal Respiratory Diseases – Signs and symptoms • Sore throat, difficulty swallowing; may progress to
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This note was uploaded on 05/24/2011 for the course BIO 119 taught by Professor Stevendroho during the Spring '11 term at Moraine Valley Community College.

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Chapter22 - Structures of the Respiratory System Function...

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