Chapter 14 - Symbiotic Relationships Between Microbes and...

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Symbiotic Relationships Between Microbes and Their Hosts Symbiosis means “to live together” We have symbiotic relationships with countless microorganisms Types of symbiosis Mutualism Commensalism Parasitism
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Symbiotic Relationships Between Microbes and Their Hosts [INSERT TABLE 14.1]
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Symbiotic Relationships Between Microbes and Their Hosts Normal Microbiota in Hosts Also termed normal flora and indigenous microbiota Refers to the organisms that colonize the body’s surfaces without normally causing disease Two types Resident microbiota Transient microbiota
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Symbiotic Relationships Between Microbes and Their Hosts Normal Microbiota in Hosts Resident microbiota Are a part of the normal microbiota throughout life Are mostly commensal
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Symbiotic Relationships Between Microbes and Their Hosts
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Symbiotic Relationships Between Microbes and Their Hosts
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Symbiotic Relationships Between Microbes and Their Hosts Normal Microbiota in Hosts Transient microbiota Remain in the body for only hours to months before disappearing Found in the same regions as resident microbiota Cannot persist in the body Competition from other microorganisms Elimination by the body’s defense cells Chemical or physical changes in the body
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Symbiotic Relationships Between Microbes and Their Hosts Normal Microbiota in Hosts Acquisition of normal microbiota Development in the womb is generally free of microorganisms (axenic) Microbiota begins to develop during the birthing process Much of one’s resident microbiota is established during the first months of life
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Symbiotic Relationships Between Microbes and Their Hosts How Normal Microbiota Become Opportunistic Pathogens Opportunistic pathogens are normal microbiota or other normally harmless microbes that can cause disease under certain circumstances Conditions that provide opportunities for pathogens Immune suppression Changes in the normal microbiota changes in relative abundance of normal microbiota may allow opportunity for a member to thrive and cause disease Introduction of normal microbiota into unusual site in the body
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Reservoirs of Infectious Diseases of Humans Most pathogens cannot survive for long outside of their host Sites where pathogens are maintained as a source of infection are termed reservoirs of infection Three types of reservoirs Animal reservoir Human carriers Nonliving reservoir
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Reservoirs of Infectious Diseases of Humans Animal Reservoirs Zoonoses diseases that are naturally spread from their usual animal host to humans Acquire zoonoses through various routes Direct contact with animal or its waste Eating animals Bloodsucking arthropods Humans are usually dead-end host to zoonotic pathogens
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This note was uploaded on 05/24/2011 for the course BIO 119 taught by Professor Stevendroho during the Spring '11 term at Moraine Valley Community College.

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Chapter 14 - Symbiotic Relationships Between Microbes and...

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