Lecture 8 - 2/23 Eukaryotic cell structure Lab 18: M...

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Unformatted text preview: 2/23 Eukaryotic cell structure Lab 18: M orphological U nknown Lab 8: contd Ch 3, 2 nd half 2/28 Controlling Micr obial Growth in Environment and the Body Lab 18: M orphological Unknown Ch 9, 10 3/2 Characterizing and Classifying Prokaryotes Lab 18: M orphological Unknown Chapter 11 3/7 Characterizing and Classifying Eukaryotes Lab 12: Population counts Chapter 12 3/9 Exam II Lab 12: contd Lab 14: Temp and pH NO CLASS Mar 14-18 SPRING BREAK 3/21 Viruses, Viroids and Prions Lab 15: Oxygen Requirements inoculate Lab 14: contd Ch 13 Upcoming Schedule Basic Principles of Microbial Control Action of Antimicrobial Agents Alteration of cell walls and membranes Cell wall maintains integrity of cell When disrupted, cannot prevent cell from bursting due to osmotic effects Cytoplasmic membrane contains cytoplasm and controls passage of chemicals into and out of cell When damaged, cellular contents leak out Viral envelope responsible for attachment of virus to target cell Damage to envelope interrupts viral replication Nonenveloped viruses have greater tolerance of harsh conditions Basic Principles of Microbial Control Action of Antimicrobial Agents Damage to proteins and nucleic acids Protein function depends on 3-D shape Extreme heat or certain chemicals denature proteins Chemicals, radiation, and heat can alter or destroy nucleic acids Can produce fatal mutants Can halt protein synthesis through action on RNA The Selection of Microbial Control Methods Ideally, agents should be Inexpensive Fast-acting Stable during storage Capable of controlling all microbial growth while being harmless to humans, animals, and objects Functions of epithelial tissue Provide physical protection The Selection of Microbial Control Methods Factors Affecting the Efficacy of Antimicrobial Methods Site to be treated Harsh chemicals and extreme heat cannot be used on humans, animals, and fragile objects Method and level of microbial control based on site of medical procedure The Selection of Microbial Control Methods [INSERT FIGURE 9.2] The Selection of Microbial Control Methods Factors Affecting the Efficacy of Antimicrobial Methods Relative susceptibility of microorganisms Effectiveness of germicides classified as high, intermediate, or low High-level kill all pathogens, including endospores Intermediate-level kill fungal spores, protozoan cysts, viruses, and pathogenic bacteria Low-level kill vegetative bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and some viruses Physical Methods of Microbial Control Heat-Related Methods Effects of high temperatures Denaturation of proteins Interference with integrity of cytoplasmic membrane and cell walls Disruption of structure and function of nucleic acids Thermal death point lowest temperature that kills all cells in broth in 10 minutes Thermal death time time to sterilize volume of liquid at set temperature Physical Methods of Microbial...
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This note was uploaded on 05/24/2011 for the course BIO 119 taught by Professor Stevendroho during the Spring '11 term at Moraine Valley Community College.

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Lecture 8 - 2/23 Eukaryotic cell structure Lab 18: M...

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