Classical Liberalism

Classical Liberalism - Classical Liberalism Classical...

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Classical Liberalism Classical liberalism was the dominant ideology of capitalism during the periods of eighteenth century. It view was widely accepted. It said that government should just sit back and watch business so they do not cheat the government also to enforce contracts. The classical had many creeds they were Psychological, economic, and ,political. Each view has its own points. In this paper I will discuss those points and show you how Bob Dole is a classical liberalist. Psychological creed of classical liberalism is based on four assumptions of human nature. People were believed to be egoistic, coldly calculating, essential inert, and atomistic. Hobbes a economics argued that people were motivated by the desire for pleasure and to avoid pain. Jeremy Bentham believed pleasure differ in intensity but there was no qualitative difference. He argued that "quality of pleasure being equal, to a pushpin is as good as poetry," The theory he is trying to say about human motivation is that the we are lazy and selfish A big part of classical liberalism is that we are coldly calculating. Being coldly calculating means that when a situation comes about we dissever what will make us receive less pain and more pleasure. Although the human motivation is by pleasure it is the decision that are cold, selfish, dispassionate, and rational assessment of the situation to choose how
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This note was uploaded on 05/21/2011 for the course ACCT 101 taught by Professor All during the Spring '11 term at Kaplan University.

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Classical Liberalism - Classical Liberalism Classical...

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