NAACP - National Association for the Advancement of Colored...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Born from the Niagara Movement, led by William E. B. DuBois, the NAACP has had a volatile birth and a lively history (Beifuss 17:E4). The impetus for the creation of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People came in the summer of 1908. Severe race riots in Springfield, Illinois, prompted William English Walling to write articles questioning the treatment of the Negro. Reading the articles, Mary White Ovington and Dr. Henry Moskowitz were compelled to meet with Walling. Consequently, the three along with a group of black and white citizens had considered the present state of the Negro, disfranchised in the South and taxed while going unrepresented in the government, a national conference needed to be held to answer the "Negro Question" (Jenkins). It was then that the idea of NAACP was created. February 12, 1909, Lincoln's birthday, a conference to review the progress that the nation made since Emancipation Proclamation and to celebrate Lincoln's birthday took place; Thereupon, a statement, now known as "The Call", was released.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/21/2011 for the course ACCT 101 taught by Professor All during the Spring '11 term at Kaplan University.

Page1 / 2

NAACP - National Association for the Advancement of Colored...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online