Vinegar - Chris Nacey Writing 101 Final draft 2 2-19-1997 V...

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Chris Nacey Writing 101 Final draft 2-19-1997 2 Vinegar V When I was a child, I spent a lot of time in the kitchen with my mother. She liked to cook and so did I. Because of this, I learned my way around the kitchen. I knew the place for everything, and I knew the uses of most everything. There was only one paradox, in my knowledge of the kitchen: vinegar. My mother had one bottle of vinegar for as long as I can remember. She never used it in cooking, or taught me how to for that matter. Our bottle of White Wine Vinegar sat in our cupboard: on the bottom shelf, enigmatically, untouched, detached. I knew that my mother wouldn't have it without reason. It was in the kitchen, so I concluded that it must be some sort of, rarely used, cooking staple. I would never have guessed then that vinegar had so many uses. Just the other day, I was in the mall visiting a friend that works at Frankincense and Myrrh. While there, I happened upon some bottles that caught my eye. They were attractive looking ornamental bottles. Each one was filled with mysterious, colored liquids: the colors varied from red to brown to yellow. In the liquids were berries', sprigs of herbs, and things of the such. I thought they looked interesting, so I picked up a bottle that I recognized as having sage in it. I took a look at the label.
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Vinegar - Chris Nacey Writing 101 Final draft 2 2-19-1997 V...

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