Civil Rights Act - Civil Rights Past Present Future We...

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Civil Rights Past Present Future
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We Shall Overcome 13 th Amendment In 1863, President Lincoln issued an Emancipation Proclamation declaring, based on his war powers, that within named States and parts of States in rebellion against the United States ``all persons held as slaves within said designated States, and parts of States, are, and henceforward shall be free; . Blacks want Georgia to apologize for slavery 14 th Amendment All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.
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Once Upon a Time Civil Rights Act of 1875 It promised that all persons, regardless of race, color, or previous condition, was entitled to full and equal employment of accommodation in "inns, public conveyances on land or water, theaters, and other places of public amusement." In 1883 the Supreme Court declared the act as unconstitutional and asserted that Congress did not have the power to regulate the conduct and transactions of individuals. Plessy v. Ferguson 1896 On June 7, 1892, a 30-year-old colored shoemaker named Homer Plessy was jailed for sitting in the "White" car of the East Louisiana Railroad. Plessy was only one-eighths black and seven-eighths white, but under Louisiana law, he was considered black and therefore required to sit in the "Colored" car. Plessey went to court and argued, in Homer Adolph Plessy v. The State of Louisiana , that the Separate Car Act violated the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Amendments to the Constitution. The judge at the trial was
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This note was uploaded on 05/21/2011 for the course PADM 840 taught by Professor Drsusangaffney during the Spring '11 term at Governors State University.

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Civil Rights Act - Civil Rights Past Present Future We...

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