10bTextbook+Chapter+13+SectionViews

10bTextbook+Chapter+13+SectionViews - Chapter 13 Section...

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Chapter 13 Section Views
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Objectives • Use cutaway, or section, views as a method for showing the features of a part that are normally hidden when presented on a multiview drawing • Decide when a section view is necessary
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Objectives (cont ` d.) • Decide what category of section view should be used for particular circumstances • Create a desired section view such that it adheres to accepted engineering drawing practices
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Introduction • Multiview drawings may not be adequate to define all features in many types of parts – Some may be obscured – Too many hidden lines cause confusion • Section views reveal interior detail
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A Look Inside FIGURE 13.01. Two views of an object (a coffee mug) with interior detail.
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FIGURE 13.03. Orthographic views of the coffee mug fail to define interior detail. A Look Inside (cont ` d.) FIGURE 13.04. A multiview drawing of the coffee mug using hidden lines to show interior detail.
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A Look Inside (cont ` d.) FIGURE 13.05. Hypothetical cutting of the object to reveal interior detail. FIGURE 13.06. A multiview drawing of the coffee mug using section views to show interior detail.
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Full Sections • Object is cut completely by cutting plane perpendicular to a standard viewing plane – Associated viewing direction • Section views do not have to remain aligned with adjacent orthogonal views • Section view can have different magnification than the view in which it was created
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Full Sections (cont ` d.) FIGURE 13.07. Creating a full section. An object is projected onto a viewing plane in (a). A cutting plane orthogonal to the viewing plane slices the object in (b). The piece to be viewed remains, while the other piece is removed in (c). The projection of the sliced object is made on the cutting plane in (d). The cutting plane and image are rotated about the section line in (e). The section view is coplanar with the viewing plane in (e).
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Full Sections (cont ` d.) FIGURE 13.12. Multiple sections with nonaligned section views and different scales.
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What Happens to the Hidden Lines? FIGURE 13.14. The need for many hidden lines in the original drawing (a) is reduced by the use of a section view (b).
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FIGURE 13.15. Examples of proper and
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This note was uploaded on 05/21/2011 for the course CEE 1770 taught by Professor Staff during the Summer '08 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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10bTextbook+Chapter+13+SectionViews - Chapter 13 Section...

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