manic episode pt care.pdf - Nursing Procedure Nursing Procedures and Skills Manic episode patient care Print Page Introduction Bipolar disorder is an

manic episode pt care.pdf - Nursing Procedure Nursing...

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5/13/2020 Nursing Procedure lnareference.wkhpe.com/ref/view.do?key=49328aa9e23895f9d25d1713a8017fe4667ff869&nmn=openProcedure&procedureId=484 1/5 Print Page Nursing Procedures and Skills: Manic episode patient care Introduction Bipolar disorder is an illness that leads to extreme and erratic shifts in an individual's mood, thinking, and behavior. It's subcategorized into bipolar I and bipolar II disorder. For a diagnosis of bipolar I disorder, a patient must meet the criteria for a manic episode. The manic episode may have been preceded by and may be followed by hypomanic or major depressive episodes. For a diagnosis of bipolar II disorder, a patient must meet the criteria for a current or past hypomanic state and the criteria for a current or past major depressive disorder. 1 Mania is one of the primary symptoms of bipolar I disorder. A patient with mania is likely to experience feelings of extreme happiness and elation, increased energy, and decreased need for sleep and food. The speech and thoughts of a manic patient are described commonly as "racing." A manic patient typically has a short attention span and can be easily distracted, which can cause the patient to become impulsive, intrusive, irritable, argumentative, and potentially violent. During a manic episode, a patient's judgment may be impaired and the patient may engage in behavior that increases the risk of harm. The patient may also experience psychosis (a break with reality), inflated self-esteem, grandiose or delusional ideas, hallucinations, increased sexual drive, and severe anxiety. Individuals experiencing mania may present at various settings, including primary care settings, schools, and hospitals. It's important to be aware of measures that can help manage a manic patient's symptoms and the adverse effects of medications prescribed to maintain emotional stability. The patient should be assessed and monitored for risk of injury, risk of violent behavior directed at self or others, nutritional deficiencies, and impaired social interactions. The patient's wishes, needs, and preferences should be honored, when possible, provided they don't interfere with the care plan established for the manic episode. Equipment Intake and output monitoring equipment Scale Prescribed medications Suicide assessment tool Implementation Don't leave the patient unattended before you have the opportunity to perform your initial assessment 2 Review the patient's medical record for a history of psychiatric illness, medication use, and other medical disorders. Perform hand hygiene. 3 4 5 6 7 8 Confirm the patient's identity using at least two patient identifiers. 9 Introduce yourself to the patient
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5/13/2020 Nursing Procedure lnareference.wkhpe.com/ref/view.do?key=49328aa9e23895f9d25d1713a8017fe4667ff869&nmn=openProcedure&procedureId=484 2/5 Assess the stage of the patient's mania by observing mood, cognition and perception levels, and activity and behavior Assess the patient's risk factors for suicide using a suicide assessment tool appropriate for the patient's age and characteristics.
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