Permian 2 - Brachiopods, which resemble superficially...

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1. Which lineage is older? a. Mammals b. Dinosaurs c. They are the same age
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Dimetrodon
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Permian Terrestrial Vertebrates
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Flowering plants Conifers
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Division Gnetales Members of this division show adaptations for life in arid environments. Only three living genera are known for this group
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2. The “Age of Fishes” a. Cambrian b. Pre-Cambrian c. Silurian d. Devonian e. Carboniferous
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Insects continue to diversify in the Permian. Coleoptera include beetles, the most speciose of insects living today
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3. The “Age of Amphibians” a. Cambrian b. Carboniferous c. Devonian d. Silurian e. Permian
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Did not survive the Permian Rugose corals
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Tabulate coral
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Many early forms of amphibians
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Unformatted text preview: Brachiopods, which resemble superficially bivalve molluscs, nearly all went extinct at the end of the Permian Likewise crinoids (a member of the Echinodermata) nearly all went extinct. Only those species living in deeper water survived; today only a few species of crinoids can be found in shallow water habitats. Last of the trilobites, in decline since the Ordovician, went extinct at end of Permian Ammonites, gone at end of Permian 4. With nearly the loss of all life on Earth, the Permian marks the end of a. Paleozoic b. Mesozoic c. Cambrian d. Cenozoic e. Pre-Cambrian...
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Permian 2 - Brachiopods, which resemble superficially...

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