Cross cultural psychology lecture 4

Cross cultural psychology lecture 4 - HumanDevelopment1:

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Human Development 1: Socialization and Enculturation
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Cultural Learning A unique feature of human beings has been labeled: “theory of mind.” By age 3 or 4, children come to understand that others have thoughts and feelings that may be different from their own. Allows for empathy, understanding, sympathy, and ability to learn from others by seeing the world from the other person’s perspective Can learn from others by imitation but also by social cognition – internalizing others approaches to life.
Background image of page 2
Definitions How do children learn about the culture in which they live? Socialization: The deliberate and/or informal shaping of the individual–the detailed processes by which children learn about their culture Enculturation: The product of socialization–the underlying psychological aspects that become internalized through development so that person acquires values and behaviors that are appropriate or necessary in that culture.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Socializing Agents Parents and immediate family (siblings, grandparents) Bronfenbrenner – Much broader than this immediate family Microsystem – immediate surroundings – family but also school, peer group Mesosystem – Exosystem – more distant and indirect agents–where parents work, church to which belong, etc. Macrosystem – Most general and distant influences culture, religion, society
Background image of page 4
Key Role of Parents Childrearing patterns related to children’s social behavior (Whitings) Nuclear family structure (father contributes) Children high on sociability; Low on agression Patrilineal families (kinship system based on father) Low on sociability; high on aggression If mother works (shares work load with father) Children share in family chores and low dependency Mother does not work Children more dependent
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/23/2011 for the course PSYCHOLOGY 2250 taught by Professor Rollins,howard during the Fall '10 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

Page1 / 19

Cross cultural psychology lecture 4 - HumanDevelopment1:

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online