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Cross-Cultural Psychology lecture 1 sp 2011(2)

Cross-Cultural Psychology lecture 1 sp 2011(2) -...

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Cross-Cultural Psychology Spring, 2011 Psychology – study of human behavior Cognitive, social, emotional, physical behaivors Research based discipline – design experiments, collect data, and then develop models or theories of human behavior Original research done in Europe and U.S. Assumed that findings were universal (same for everyone, everywhere)
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Cross Cultural Psychology Cross Cultural Psychology attempts to determine whether findings of psychology are universal or whether human behavior varies according to what culture one lives in. The answer is yes and no – some universals and some aspects of human behavior depend on culture. Cross Cultural Psychology aims to develop theories of human behavior that take into account universals and culture specific human behaviors and thus make theories more accurate and complete. Important to understand from outset that the findings are not about which cultures are better than which other cultures. Aim is to help cultures understand one another better and to respect any differences that occur.
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Cross-Cultural Psychology Definitions: Culture: Simple: Relatively stable way of life of a people Complex: Set of attitudes, behaviors, and symbols shared by a large group of people and usually communicated from one generation to the next.
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Definition of Culture To cross-cultural psychologist, cultures are seen as products of past human behavior and shapers of future human behavior (humans are both producers of culture and influenced by culture). Attitudes, behaviors, and symbols Explicit versus implicit culture (we are often not aware of our “culture” until we visit another culture). The textbook: “a unique meaning and information system, shared by a group and transmitted across generations, that allow the group to meet basic needs of survival, pursue happiness and well-being, and derive meaning from life” More than the daily uses of this term: not “high culture”; not civilization – all human groups possess culture (as opposed to idea of civilized versus primitive).
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