Mark_Lecture - BibleasLiterature Lectures25&26...

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Bible as Literature March 29 & 31, 2010
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Administrative  We hope you had an outstanding spring  break!! Quiz 5 today Name and netid on scantron RA 2 to come back on Friday. Format for next three weeks M and W: Lecture F: Discussion of the theological portrait of Jesus 
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Gospel of Mark Story and Narrative  in the Gospels
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Recall some terminology “Narrative” refers to the structuring of the events into  a unified whole. “Story” refers to the events related in  a narrative. A shared “story” can acquire different structures in  different retellings Example: “Wife-sister” stories
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Reviewing the Action Exposition: Preparation for Ministry  (1:1-15) Ministry of John Baptism of Jesus Testing in the Wilderness Rising Action: Galilean Ministry  (1:16-8:26) Initiation of Ministry Selection of first disciples Sabbath Exorcism Itinerant Preaching Conclusion: Criticism of disciples Healing of blind man Pivot: Caesarea Philippi (8:27-9:29) Confession of Peter 1 st  Passion prediction Call to discipleship Transfiguration Falling Action: Jerusalem Ministry  (9:30-15:47) Journey to Jerusalem (9:30-10:52 ) 2 nd  Passion Prediction Arguments among disciples 3 rd  Passion Prediction and arguments. Healing of blind Bartimaeus In Jerusalem (11:1-16:8) Entry to Jerusalem Assault on Temple Disputes with Temple authorities Last supper Betrayal and arrest Trial before Sanhedrin Hearing before Pilate Crucifixion and Centurion’s Confession Conclusion: Empty Tomb (16:1-8) Empty Tomb Narrative
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Kerygma” as “Story” For I handed on to you  as of first importance what I in  turn had received : that Christ died  for our sins in  accordance with the scriptures, and that he was buried and that he was raised  on the third day in accordance  with the scriptures, and that he appeared to Cephas, then  to the twelve.  Then he appeared to more than five  hundred brothers and sisters at one time, most of whom  are still alive, though some have died.  Then he appeared  to James, then to all the apostles.  Last of all, as to one  untimely born, he appeared to me. 1 Cor 15:3-8 (excerpted) Two other accounts of early kerygma: Acts 2:16-36,  10:34-43
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Mark as “Narrative”
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“Mark” and its “Author” Author of “Mark” is Anonymous.  External evidence not strong:  Text is not titled “Gospel According to Mark” in earliest tradition No claims internal to text: Author does not identify his relationship to the characters in the 
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Mark_Lecture - BibleasLiterature Lectures25&26...

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