0308 - Quiz 5 Scores posted on Compass JOURNALISM 405...

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0308 PowerPoint 1 JOURNALISM 405 History of American Journalism March 8, 2011 Quiz 5 • Scores posted on Compass • Average was 4.5 • REMINDER: There will be more than six quizzes, so you can throw out your low scores Page 141 Quiz 6 1. From the very beginning of the Civil War, the Union military imposed strict, mandated censorship of correspondents covering the war. a) True b) False Page 134 Quiz 6 2. Northern newspapers withheld sharp criticism of President Lincoln during the Civil War . a) True b) False
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0308 PowerPoint 2 Pages 137–138 Quiz 6 3. New York City publishers Horace Greeley and Henry Raymond were rivals for both newspaper readers and elected political positions. a) True b) False Pages 127–128 Quiz 6 4. To help distribute much-valued war news, telegraph companies offered low-cost transmissions of newspaper stories during the Civil War. a) True b) False Page 130 Quiz 6 5. Which IS NOT one of the constraints or adversities faced by Southern newspapers during the Civil War? a) Military censorship b) Low-quality reporting c) Paper shortages d) Huge increases in subscription rates e) All the above were constraints faced by Southern papers Press before the war • About 2,500 newspapers operating • 283 dailies in the North; 80 dailies in the South • 17 dailies in New York City alone • Typical paper was 4 to 8 pages
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0308 PowerPoint 3 By no means impartial • Newspapers were still very clear in their allegiances to various political factions • Much more fractured in North than in the South • Southern papers in particular were solidly behind secession and the war effort Northern alliances Radical Republicans: The only reason to go to war was the abolition of slavery. Moderate Republicans: Supported abolition but saw the war more as struggle to preserve the union. Northern alliances Independents: Held middle ground. Were Democrats in the North who knew they needed to reunite with Democrats in the South to be a strong national party. Copperheads:
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This note was uploaded on 05/23/2011 for the course JOUR 405 taught by Professor Liebovich,l during the Spring '08 term at University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

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0308 - Quiz 5 Scores posted on Compass JOURNALISM 405...

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