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Buck v. Bell From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation , search Buck v. Bell Supreme Court of the United States Argued 22 April, 1927 Decided 2 May, 1927 Full case name Carrie Buck v. James Hendren Bell, Superintendent of State Colony for Epileptics and Feeble Minded Citations 274 U.S. 200 ( more ) 47 S. Ct. 584; 71 L. Ed. 1000; 1927 U.S. LEXIS 20 Prior history Error to the Supreme Court of Appeals of the State of Virginia Holding The Court upheld a statute instituting compulsory sterilization of the unfit "for the protection and health of the state." Court membership Chief Justice William H. Taft Associate Justices Oliver W. Holmes, Jr. · Willis Van Devanter James C. McReynolds · Louis Brandeis George Sutherland · Pierce Butler Edward T. Sanford · Harlan F. Stone Case opinions Majority Holmes, joined by Taft, Van Devanter, McReynolds, Brandeis, Sutherland, Sanford, Stone Dissent Butler Laws applied
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U.S. Const. amend. XIV Buck v. Bell , 274 U.S. 200 (1927), was the United States Supreme Court ruling that upheld a statute instituting compulsory sterilization of the unfit, including the mentally retarded , "for the protection and health of the state." It was largely seen as an endorsement of negative eugenics —the attempt to improve the human race by eliminating "defectives" from the gene pool . Contents [ hide ] 1 Background 2 The effect of the ruling 3 The case 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External links [ edit ] Background The concept of eugenics had been put forward in 1883 by Francis Galton , who also coined the name. [1] The trend first became popular in Europe, but also found proponents in the United States by the start of the twentieth century. Indiana passed the first eugenic sterilization statute (1907), but it was legally flawed. To remedy this situation, Harry Laughlin of the Eugenics Record Office (ERO) at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory , designed a model eugenic law that was reviewed by legal experts. In 1924 the Commonwealth of Virginia adopted a statute authorizing the compulsory sterilization of the mentally retarded for the purpose of eugenics. This 1924 statute was closely based on Laughlin's model. [2]
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This note was uploaded on 05/23/2011 for the course UGS 303 taught by Professor Foster during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Wiki Buck v - Buck v. Bell From Wikipedia, the free...

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