National Statement on Research Integrity in Social Work

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Unformatted text preview: a, INTEGRITY IN SOCIAL WORK Cnntents lintkgmund 21nd Pickumvludg-L'ulmuh .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ] IntrudLlcriul'l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Rcspnnxihlc Cnnduct HF RUSL‘flrCI‘I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 A Call 1:: [I'm I‘mr'L-ssim fur (ircatm' llwnlvcmcnt in the Respnnfiil‘rlv {Imuluct nf Ra’s-earth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . “5-1 Hefcn: mus, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ‘3‘ enuncIL nu EUEIAL waits snucatiiiii— NATIONAL STATEMENT ON RESEARCH INTEGRITY IN SOCIAL WORK Background and Acknowledgements The Council on Social 'Worlc Education :CSW'E] managed the development of this Nations! Stntcirtent and corresponding Action Plan to Research Integrity! in Social iii-"ore wlth the crucial assistance ot- the social work education cointttunity'. Over 5:} social work deans, directors. tacuity members, and doctoral students participated in a Symposiuttt on the Responsible Conduct oi: Social 1'iiii'rork Research at the lliilti Annual Program Meeting in Chicago. These participants proyldcd guidance for the initial work for this project hy outlining the pressing issues in social work research and the potential scope and purposes for this National Stt'itemt'flt. Those conyened included reprcSentatiyes from baccalaureate and graduate programs of various sizes and institutiortal settings from all ten CS‘WE regions. (SSW-E heavily relied on their analyses and recommendations for deyeloping the subsequent National Statement and Action Plan. We are grateful for their work and insight. The purpose of this i"\i'ati'it:iriai_r Statement is to preside broad guidance and education to socialwork researchers. In june Eilflt'it a work group of social work researchers who participated in the Chicago Sytttposiuttt collaborated with ESE-"IE to focus on the outcomes From the Symposium and to develop the final Nationai Stateroom and Action Plait. This work group included Lee Badger [Fordhani Uniyersity‘]1 Phyllis Black [Mary-wood Llniversity'k. Loretta Hrewer {Arkansas State University], jatnes Clark [Llniyersity or Kcntuckrlt Elizabeth Fssex tCitweI'noi's State University], Sheldon R. Gelman t‘t'eshiya University :u Kay Iiotfman (University of Kentucky], Dorothy ldlehurg [Mississippi ‘r'alley State L'niyersityh Robert Prue [University oi: Kansas]. and Nancy Shore tLJnis'ersity of New England]. The group’s efforts led to this Natrtmot' Staterttertt on Researth Integrity- fi': Soot-I! Work and an Action Plan for Promutmg Research integrity t'n Sorta! fi’hnk. CSWF is yery appreciatiye to these ten scholars for their indispensable contributions to this project and for sharing their time and expertise with CSWE. Most research activity is designed1 generated. and managed in college and university settings. fits the organization that seryes social work educators and students1 CS‘WE recognizes “research” as an integral dimension ofits mission. The newly Formed CSWL Office of Social Work Education and Research is committed to promoting research integrity in social work and to providing social work programs, deans. ; I.-.~t-t:iii-s ‘--.‘II|I. W-iittl'H-Naii-ix directors, faculty, and students with support itt their research endeayors. The purpose of this National .H'rareriieitr is to pros ide lsroael guidance and education to social work researchers and should not he construed as an outline of rules to lie eiifotced hy CSWl'.. The Council on Social 1|ill’orl-c l-idttcation is also especially thankful to the US. Departrtieiit of Health and Human Scryices {lit-ice of Research lntcgrity {HRH and the American Association of Peleclical Colleges {fifth-1C], 1iyl'iich proyided funding for this project.”' Introduction The {iotii‘leil on Social Work Education I'Itesettts this Ntrtrorrtif Statement on Research integrity fir .lirieiai' lit-"orig as a way of assisting social workers in identifying the challenges of coritlttcting erhically-respoiisihle research. Research activities are essential for the continued gross'th and irriprot'einent of the profession. Social work pracdtioners have a professional duty to proyide clients with effective services, while sociai ss'orlt researchers have an obligation to assist them in meeting that fidttciary responsibility. Social n-‘orlccrs practice with individuals, families. groups, organisations. and 1Well—designed social work research can contribute significantly to the development and refinement of effective practice approaches at all levels and in all settings. communities in a wide range of sertings, According to the National Association of Social 1|Cliforlters lH.-"LS'tiii-"fl Code on! firfrt'rs, a “historic and definng feature ofsocial a-‘orlt is the professions focus on individual well- heing in a social context and the ss'ell-Iieirig of society“ I E9thi, p. I]. 1'i‘iiiiell- desigiictl social work research can conttihttre significantly to the deyeloprnent and refinement of effective practice approaches or all lerels anti in all settings, as already evidenced by important contrihutions in the domains of mental health, substance rnistise, gerontology, and child welfare. In this Natfoiiaf Shri't’iireii'r, research is defined as a sysrernaric process of ittyestigation and analysis that develops and [iron'itilgates generalist-.1 l'de knowledge to inform professional practice and nthCidl policy. Throughout the research process—which typically includes the ctinccpttialiaatioii of a research idea... developtttent of a rrialale design, purposeful selection and recruitment of study participants, implementation of the Study in the field, data entry, analysts, and interpretation, and, finally, dissett'iiriatiott of research findings—there are numerous ethical considerations to he addressed and decisions to be made. Pilortg with the. ethical tensions inherent in the research process itself, researchers face a growing and complex set of laws and ethical regulations that they need to Understand and follow. ° |-|:i1 [‘rtlitx't L'- .1s ‘1.l|'|F‘1|l'fL'|.l under .1 cooperate-1' .l|.',l'i'.'l.'."l'l|.'l'l[ 1-flill'll ll‘iL' [Hr:..t or llt'sL'JILl: [i‘ilegi it} ICU“:- rl‘ii'tiiiigl‘i the :1LII'IL'IILIEII .".sslh.i.‘itit:-i1 ii| Htsiiciil {.tllltgci- ll iriiiit i1iiiiil1i'r l'hlhrll'fllslil | I. Pizllliciilislii .1:i:.1 report contents are solely |l1t rc-.|‘-iiri-i.'.liili|-. or rli:' authors and ti.” 'I-Clr necessarily ri'ijrt -.-.'i1r '.l'.l' official cit-um or rail .'1|..'1I “I: or rht- URI. “silo-v. sl'.||t|:\' -1\ Illx- '.|-:-.'| |\||-.I: I'. 's h-I-l'.|1-1i'-lls t Responsible Conduct of Research '1 he rnans' domains of inquiry and the diverse settings that concern social sec irlt researchers requ ire pluralistic strategies. .‘iocial not}; scl'iolarsl'iip requires rnultidisciplinart' approaches that span conceptual and Int-tl'iodological domains of great hreadth. lair esarnple, the stud} of suhstance misuse in a continunits might require the researcher to hate expertise in L]t1t1lthlEl'-'s.‘illltlt]tlt1|1Ill'flTl"-'L' rnetl'lodkH as well :ts to dernoiistrate proficiency in engaging colnrnunitje leaders and research particii'utnts. Other social 1a'or}; researchers engage in t‘n'ogi'al'l‘l etaliiations. sii‘lgle-stlhiect design. t‘ral'tit'ipatorr action research, :tnd secondary data analysis. ."iuch research protocols ma l<e eol'nples and I:aried ethical demands on the researchers. Research should he conducted in accordance with the principles articulated in the lieltnont Report IT‘s'atinnal (ionitniiision for the Protection of Human l'iuhiects of Biomedical and I‘ieltaiioi'al Research, I'iJ'F‘FL N915“? {irate of Ethics | 199$}. the (Jilt'l-i fari’m'arirmai' I’rii'i'rj: and r".t'eredirtrtioo .‘Sraittt'trrds tl‘tll] I 'I. and the other applieahle organisational and governmental roles and regulations. Ftliieal research tunst account not oiin ior design considerations~ hut also tor process teat” gathering data. i'eer'uinnent. inl'ormed consent. cit-a and outcornerimpact of the research proieci te.g._ disseiiiinatiiin—iricludirig authorship. impact on best practices, intpact on cornrnurntt; IntEIi'Idiial well-lacing. etcfil. Ethical research must account not only for design considerations. but also for process and ootcornefiropact of the research project. Io enstire the responsible conduct oF research. social Work researchers need to: I 1 II work to protect the people and communities 1.rliorn they study: lli ethically and ell-ectirely participate in mentoring relationships that are crucial to scientific actis‘itt'; I13:- rnanatae apparent and implicit conflicts of interest and cotrtniltn'leiit; I4: collahorate ethically ti'ith researchers from other professions and disciplines: [Si ensure that research data issues are managed properly; :til ernpios' respoiisihle pnhlication and authorship practices; I.-!- respoiisihlt' conduct :tnd coI'IttihLIte to the peer-resins process; and Eli] understand and present research misconduct [UH]. EEHJfi]. [n the sections below we discuss each of these areas of cottcerii aiitl hrieflfr discuss particular issues facing social work researchers. 1. ._ _- -.__|: ..-_\.-. Ill '.I'.I'_-.!:k|'|.| ._: \ Human Subjects anti Communities fitlt‘ifll Wlill'h I'L'hIJéTL'iIL'I'H [111151' sti'ix'c nnr Tn harm [ht- pcupk u]- Ettt'l'ul'l'ltltlitiL’H that the} Mr hiLlLi}'i[l].§. Rust-.1 Fri: prnmunin ahnuld t'irai L'HHLH'L' EI'IL‘ pl'tlrt‘utinr‘u Uf- itLIdy ].'|'.'|.|"'ltt_'i[".-.l||1.‘:. inuintling unmidrrntiun i-Ul' :hL' Basin: lithe-5:1] I’rinL'iplo't (imcriitml in [I‘IL'HUIEHU'I'II:1{I:'I'I[JIT_ Ht’sjh't'F Iu'lirJ." ftt'r'5erJté “inL'nrpnt-atcs at lunn't tu'n L>Thi..::ll {IIIII'I'L ininna: t'il'h't. tth inLlik'id'umlw' slmuid E‘lt' Eruatt‘tl .15 .-.1L|*.I."|1|:][[lt:-L1.‘~':1HL'I1TH.:1I1ti Ht't'nnti. that purunnx 1.t'JtI'I tlimil'lisl'mti Jiltnl'mrnf.‘ an; untitled tn pmtrctittfi'i [PL 41-. HL'JFL'I-h rm: ' 2155mm thnt 11L‘1'x‘nl15.‘ an: “tl't'ttl't'ti in .trl L'thiml |1'|'.tll|'|L'l'1'IIIIIE uni}: it}. r'uhpt't'ting th-L'it Licutainnx;}11L[priit._-._-Li115; thL-i'n h'ntu|1.1I'n1.hn:;1iau by making; Efforts tn nucnru tht‘ir well hrinp‘" Iprl. 4—.‘il. _.|rn'|'>'!n'r.'t' |'L‘|'_]Lli|'L'F- that th.~ “HL'IL'L‘liLJn uli rematch anhiectfi nuudi. [n In- bL'TLlTZiE'liJIL'Li in [mint Tn LiL'ILfrfiiiiil: whuth-L't xnl'nu cifli‘m'i my}, patiunh FL‘L'L'i ring gm'urnmurt artiamnuu. t'LIhJur.1h]I:I':1;1:1| :1l1tiu‘Ti‘IHiufithiI'ItIr'iIit'h..tHLi inxtitutinnnlixud pt’l'fit‘lt'lé'l .Iru: huing 5}'~.-:t-L'tnntic;1]lj.' .wuiuuluti Himpijx' i_"I-L't_".1=.'.I->L‘ (H‘ Ti‘lL'il' msy ;1‘I.".1Ii;‘li'}iii[f.'. their CU|‘|'|]‘IF[‘I['||i‘n-(_'Li. pttr-ii'riul'l. m' thuil' rtmni]‘ILI|.'1hi]it'_.~ I.1thurt|'r::1'.’rnr Icaxnns diructh' FUi'fiTL‘Li tn tin: pmhlrln lacing thIdit-Li" Ip. (a? [Nathan-4| (Tmun-mmnn 5m thL- I’i'utuutiun tit l [Lll1'I'.'-.]] .‘iuhiuutn‘ nt- Einnwtiiml and [tuligticiml 1 |~'.-.'~'.*.1I'.-_'.'., ! '.-J ._9 :. Htat‘al'tit irtutitirtg ‘|.'Lli|||..'|'.li"iL' [‘UpLiiJTHJHS nurdr‘. r:tfi.‘.‘§1]rt‘[i1fi["iak [it harm in I11i1'IEI1'Iiqud €II'Iti I'llfl'lL‘i-ilb 1}an l]]i.'T-L'.‘>I'_'.1I'L'if":'.1!'I'_‘ squint-DH Llistl'ihnt-L'tl. Kit-"hilt: th‘muninu pmtnunla [t5 pl'ulL-L‘l miner-.1111»; punplc and Cm‘nrmn‘lilin p.111 11:: L'xtrun'luh' ul'mih‘nuing, tnml m' -.1r'h~itr-.1-.':. t'tclllfilm'l Hf ‘t'Llll'lL‘l'tli'liC pupuifltinrh i-FUEE'. tuxuurt'h ix dutl'ltucnmi Tn thu: puupl-L' Ei'lL' pl'nffisinn aort'rci.‘ and can hum-times cunsL-itutu r'L'H-L'flr'ch tittnfltHLiLlLT. HtJL'iu] u'nl'k Icfiunruh in duwlnping {LJLII'flr'iL'H Fur-0'1 additinrml .1ridrcpt-ciulin-d L‘thiual prultiums in hunmn pI'UtL‘L'tiUH that Litlht‘l't't ‘iDC'L'iflI t‘IJI'IHidL'I'LttiHJ‘I. Rathur than .11't3-iLilltg [ht-w tfitiliicuhiux. tuxuuruht‘rk fihfillhi wnI'L' with their culiLvagut-i. :_1nr.| [I'IL‘ .‘Ipprnpriutu irhtilulitltml Rut'itu' litmnlx IIIREisi tn tim'elnp lav-.11.». l'li‘lCTi‘JLCHiiFil'lEillLil"r'l1if1t'rfll'lit' pupilhtticn‘m in rt'hL'fll'L'h. l’iu'tiulpntmn in I'L‘ht'Ell'L'i‘l hhnuhl hr; pl'ud'.-:.':1tctl nn T]‘.H.' nnrunrlul participant“. lII'ILiL'TStcll'Idilu‘. HF the Prltliucli... including nhtuining infttl'n'lud cnnwnt. l'inuilt; maul wm'k I'L‘HE'UFL'I'ILW'S shimhl Lac-up in mind that thticntx in'. uiwd .15. I'L‘hL'dl'L'h nurtsczpnntu :1 n: m 11-: atthrdcd thu mm..- DI'IJTL‘CTiUI'IH '.".‘~ an:- nth-2r pupuintinn. HL'i-HFL' huginrting .‘nn' r::.l.L'.1I'a:h im'cxtlgntinn. tumutrchuru shinnhi I'L‘L‘Ci'u't‘ :1“ Ih‘LIt'RH'J r1- appr'm'fli [rum lhI: urgaliizntinna] r-L'gulntnrj.‘ hutii-L'h. Thu nl'gunixttinnJl I't‘gniutm'y hndiL-a, Hugh m; [hr I‘L’Ht'flrui‘lm'ih [Ihtilutiufldl Rut'iuu' BttflrLi. wiii nrm'uit: nnnthur |-.1j.':_-r [it Pruniurim'l Fur tit-1' |‘r.1rti-.'ipanI.-; and CUJ’JNHUEEtficfi in ruxmruh. h-j.‘ ensuring that partinch lawn and gLIiLit-iinu.‘ Imu- [1UL-11111u111:.-rI1L- N -.i :o\ -.| 51 -.ri ‘ill ‘\'I :‘Nllel'.|-:I.'i=lN||I.:|1.||‘I |\ F-.!t.i u ‘t‘t'oio. ‘3 protocol and that the research is ethical. Researchers should consult with colleagues and the Office of Research InteatiryflRB staffs in their institutions and universities if they have questions regarding regeilator}r hodies. Hent urf Trainee Responsibility Social worlt researchers have a resporisii‘lilit}.' to mentor trainees in a manner that enhances tlte professional development of the latter and advances the general progress of the profession. Mentoring gttnior researchers and trainees in social work research serves to instill the nieiitee with the ethics, techniques. and Community of the profession {Fae-gird 5c Hyman-Browne, n.d.]. Social work’s commitment to advancing the careers of traditionally underrepresented and marginalized groups indicates a special commitment to mentoring trainees who often experience isolatiott and exaggerated expectations in academic and research settings. Senior researchers and mentors have a special responsibility to act ethically toward iunior researchers and tratnees by avoiding-.5 implicit and explicit exploitation. Mentorng relationships are complex: collaborative agreements that are developed early in the working relationship and that clearly tteiineate the I'll-.Lhi'h' and responsihilities of all parties can he s'erj.‘ helpiul in ensuring fair and just outcomes. Mentoring junior researchers and trainees in social work research serves to instill the mentee with the ethics. techniques. and community of the profession. Conflicts of Interest and tnrnmitment Social work researchers are encouraged to develop relationships u-itli public and private institutions. However. social work researchers should scrutiniIe their research Endeavors and seek to avoid and eliminate Til'l‘_-' irriproper conflicts of interest that might result from their activities. These can involve tangible Conflicts. such as untoward financial gain. but may also involve other and intangible forms of improper personal enhancement or advancement. Despite institutional pressures to attract high levels of external funding and to lead multiple pl'nieCts. social work researchers should judiciously.r commit only to those proiects and positions which they can reasonably undertake. The ll'ilml'tli‘l' and cornpleicit}r of eonterttporargx i'eseai'chers' roles make this a challenging domain of responsible conduct. EnlLahnrative Scion to Contemporary social work research Is rarcljt an individual enterprise. h-‘luitidisciplinari' and CttltttTlLJEtii‘I--i‘|;15|.3t.l resea rich are often required. especially for significant research investigations. Social work researchers should engage in collaborative enterprises with other professions attd disciplines to advance scientific knowledge. These efforts will require special artemlon and sensitivity to the ethos and cultures of those research partners. Social work researchers also shottld seek to clarify. and in many i'1 LZIH \i : ‘I.‘I..i|.--._ I --. -_ I.-\ eases emntiiit ti: a written agreement. issues pertaining re.- data tneriership, authrirship. prniect rniesa and tin-ancia] management. .‘I'Lh' the grim-t]: Ui tratialatiunal science ennrinues, main] wnrk researchers will inereasingir cnllahnrate with cnIrnnLtnities. [t is impart-ant that researchers wnrlt hartl ['U understand and reamnalily respnnel tn ineal needs and expect-Minus as research PI'UiL‘L'l'fi are designed! implemented, and published. This is especiain ci‘inlieneil'lg as sticiai wnrk researchers ntten cuiinhurnte IWith L‘citnliitlniT3' trienii'ners whu euine imn‘i rerjr' different hackgrnunds and hare gnals that are divergent heart the researchers. Data Acquisition. Management. Eharing. and Dwnership The rapid tier-elupment tit eitciting technrilngtes Eur tl-at-a acquisitie-n. analysis, and sharingI create cnn‘tpies ethicai chailenges fur sineial wnrk researchers. Researchers need In eLJI'IHLIh' am': umierstand The regttlatiting and tih'ligatinns insulted as they cnntlnet research. The federal grirernnient and must nther spnnsnrs stipulate What these rihhgatinns sh-aii he when a researcher is awarded a? grant GT etiiitr-aet. Universities alsti hare neilicies and reeniatitins in this titiiuairi which create. nhiigatinns tnr researchers uhti are, in effect. agents {Jl' these acadetnic institutinns. The hesr a'iI‘HTEgF in m dlscLIfiE the particniar appmaches the researcher will take with spnnstirs and their academic cnileagnes ea rI} itt the lite {if the research pmiect. It is impnrtant that the entire research team understands these issue:- as 1are“. as theft ntten :ntersect with nuire mundane persunnei issues, trii' ewarnl'nie. changing itihs UF nim‘ine tti a new institntiun. Publication Practices and Respansihle Authorship :"m inipm'tant pa rt nr snctal WflTiC research is the repurting I‘Jf study I'esnits. I’nhiicattnn til: research findings .8thde inehnie appl'tlpl'late atttihtttiiiri tit tiLiLi'lUTtiilip. Authors and ctr-authors ahmild he determined tin the hasis (if the type and attuiunt int wnrh euinplered. 'I'here can he cnntrnx'ersr m'er whu shnLIId he included 35 an anthtii; especially since being: identified at. an author nr first .1th]]I."F tin a puhlicatitm can hare implicatinns fur ECELLIFC11-Lliidiiig, and either prnfessinnal nppnrtnnities; beginning: discussirmfi Hf aLtthnrship earlier in the research princess can reduce cuntusiuza. Many unirersities. departments. peer-rerieweel iULil'i'la'liti, and 11rtifessim'i:1i nrgantxatiuns have specific pnlieies ULIthI'IiI'Ig The criteria fur whu quaiiiies as an ‘anrhrir" fur a pnhhcatiun i1'ii5l1t'r. 1-’ttsgirt{, Eu: Ht'rnari-Hrriwne, n.d.i. Ii. Social wtirk researchers must never Faiiricate data {tl' tinhiish data that are knnwn tn he fabricated nr tithe-raise L'nl'l'lt‘lr'nmisied in nature UT engage in plagiarism. All ideas and phrasing. Imt titiginating with the attthtir tir cn-anrhnr thnnld he apprnpriatel} NilloxoHints-AM-.I\]t|-I.te~|||1.5|t.|t||i Ishhln 'L'L-I-ck acknowledged in publication of results. Researchers should respect ethical obligations. regulations. and laws pertaining to intellectual property, copyright, and parents. Complex developments in technologies and regulations regarding data acquisition. management. sharing. and ownership demand special consideration. The emergent quality of these areas requires social work researchers to regularly study pertinent issues. problems. and solutions as they develop. '3'. Peer Review Peer review is critical For the advancement of science. Journals and federai- and private-granting organizations are reliant upon. reviewers to ensure the duality of their publications and awards. Social work researchers should participate In the peer—review process in a fair. constructive. and rigorous manner. Additionally. peer- review processes should he timely and protect the conFltlentialitir of all participants. Social work researchers should identify all potential con Flicts oi: Interest and also strive to suhorclinate their personal preferences and hiases to the higher pttrposes of advancing the profession. scientific activity. and the public welfare. 5. Research Hlfitfl nduct Consequences for engaging in research misconduct are varied but may include ineligibility for future grants. termination of positions. monetary penalties, or other penalties. Findings of research misconduct result in negative pulilieiry for the researchert'rescarci'i team and for the university. if the university is also implicated in misconduct ie.g.. chronic "unresponsiveness of the IRE-i sanctions may include the withdrawal of fetleral authorizations and funding. Social work researchers have an obligation to work hard to prevent research misconduct, to report such misconduct when it occurs, and to support colleagues who attempt to do both despite the personal and professional risks involved. for se]ecteci or For all Federally-sponsored research. It is also important to note that local or state jurisdictions might impose criminal or civil penalties it such investigations reveal crlniinal misconduct or tortious hehavlor. Loss of personal integrity. ntoral authority. and community trust transcend the particular events associated with misconduct cases by destroying the relationships enioyecl by researchers and the wider community for years. In sum. research misconduct can he extraordinarily ctiSLly to all persons and tin. s: H on “‘I'.||. I si ‘t‘-'-.::.I. I. I.||o\ organtxations concerned. ll'irinseqnerices extend hes-'ond issues of lial‘lilitz.‘ and damage to retnttation,I to include darn-age to: [ll relationships with the participating communities; [1| individuals involved in the. work; and {3] professional integrity. Llndetected research misconduct can have even grasct consequences, including!J the dissemination of practice technologies, programs, and social policies that have relied on unlountletl or distorted scientific work. The. result might he the waste of limited social resources, loss of life. or reduced personal well-being;J for clients and sienil'ieant harm to the |'.ILll‘-Illl..' welfare. 'I'hei'efoi'e. social work researchers have an obligation to work hard to present research misconduct, to report such misconduct when it occurs, and to support colleagues who attempt to do hotli despite the personal and professional risks instills-ed. A Ball to the Profession for Greater Involvement in the Responsible Conduct of Research in closing. we urge social work researchers to act with integrity not only to avoid trouble, but to do so in order to enhance the conduct of research. Social workers should ioin the work or the federal ptn-‘eri‘irtten'l and universities as the Office of Research Integrity and other bodies deliberate. design. and disseminate research regulations and policies. Social work researchers can provide crucial insights to the deliberations on research regulations and policies. It is especially important to add the pragmatic voices of social work researchers who typically work outside of the traditional biomedical and laboratory sites that all too often are the contexts envisioned by such policy makers. Regulations should enhance the responsible conduct or research a nd should not make scientific Work iinpossihle. Social work researchers can provide crncial insights to such tlelil'ierations and should do so whenever possible in order to protect the interests ol the professionc our clients and the public. Social work professors should join their local IRl-ls as full members and participate In the irriportant work of protecting human snhjecrs. .‘ioeial work practitioners can also join Hills as corrnnurtitj: volunteers and representatives—iniportant positions that "His are required to fill on each committee. We also call on social work erhieists and researchers to advance the conceptual and empirical scl'iolarsl'iip that can enrich the overall knowledge base important to the conduct at responsihle research. N '.| .i-\ it Hi ‘ill .‘ill \I -.~\' HI -| -.i.. '-| I\ |' :..c| n |\ h.-t_~_|‘.1.'t-it_-_ Li References Cnuneii un Streiui Wnrit Education. [2001]. faint-titmnai pm’tey mm‘ .‘i't't‘re-tl'itti'tt'tm standards. .fiiievnndria, ‘v'fii: fittttl‘iur. Eisnen R... ‘v'asgird, ll. 5C I-Ivrnnn-Brmvtte. E. I_n.d.]. RCR reslrttmst'bir’ trtrtiaryrek'ip and peer rut-were. Retrieved juntiary 'J :T~ lflfl-l {mm i'l'frpuff:L211mti.et1iLll'i'ii‘Iia.eeiniprtJieetm’rerfrerjttithtai'shipf Natinl'ltli (-itimll'liSSiUT‘l i't'tr the PrfltL'L'Tifln ttf Httrnnn Stihieets tut Bim'nediettl and BCI'IFWiUi'fli ResettrL‘h. i WW]. The Beintmtt Report. Retrieved October 13* liiiifi, item httpzi'-“ni]sr.t}ti.ttih.gnvigilitie]inesfhelnanI-itml Natitlnai ri'L‘iflflL'i'v'lEif‘il'l Hf fineitti Workers. | WW: 1-. {Tracie rJf'eti'Jt'trs ii: sari-,1! tenth. Wistshingtun, DES: .Jmthttr, Cliiice vi Research Integrity, Departittent nF Health and Human Services. I'lillflé]. Rt‘sptntsibie CUIEKL‘IL'! of nesmrrb. Retrieved Dmemher 3. Eimt-i, fmm http:.-'-"nri.dI‘ihs.gihi-iedtte;1tititii" ‘v’asgird. Li, (Y. Hj.‘ttttit'i-Brtivrrie1 ll. in.t_i.J. RCR mentoring. Retrieved Januarv I5, ZUUF, trnm htEpiHuri.dhhs.gt]viedLientittnipmdtietefenlttm [ti-.1 whtfreLute-uniting! CSWE is grateful tn eii the petiple win} were invnlved iii the Natimmi Statement deveittpn‘tenr prtteess; the statement was deveieped With euiiai‘ttit‘atiun irutn the ftflitnving iririivitltmis, Nafienm‘ Statement Deeeiopmem Team Lee Badger thliit mutt Loretta Brewer JiJI'I‘IIES Clark Eiizuheth liexex Sheidttn R. Geimal'i Kay Huffman Dorethv Idlebu rg Ftn'dhnin University 1 lawn-nod Universitv Arkansas State Universitv University of Kentucky (Tim-emote State University Yeshiva University University n’r' Kentucky and President tat (LSWE Mississippi Rainer State University Robert Prue Llriiversity tif Knttstts Haney Sherri University of New Enginnd eswE Staff Julia M. "iii-"fruiting:I Executive Director- F.. Aracelis Finneis. Director. Ofiiee of Streiai Witt]: Education and Researeh Dean Pierce, Uirerrm', Office nf 5min] VII-"Lark :"LL'L'reditatitm :mti Educatith Exeeiienee Jessica Httln'ies', Resenrt'ifl Assmt'tttte ...
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This note was uploaded on 05/24/2011 for the course SOWK 305 taught by Professor Yeom during the Spring '11 term at James Madison University.

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National Statement on Research Integrity in Social Work -...

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