ch13.docx - CHAPTER 13 Systems Development and Project Management IT at Work IT at Work 13.1 U.S Census Project Out of Control 1 What went wrong The

ch13.docx - CHAPTER 13 Systems Development and Project...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 20 pages.

CHAPTER 13 Systems Development and Project Management IT at Work IT at Work 13.1 U.S Census Project Out of Control 1. What went wrong? The Census Bureau was scrapping its $600 million project to collect data using 500,000 handheld devices. The government reverted to counting the nation's 300 million people the old-fashioned way: with paper and pencil. The new estimated life cycle cost for the 2010 Census is $13.7 to $14.5 billion (from $11.8B). Mismanagement, cost overruns, and poor planning caused the project to fail. Poor management—not poor technology— caused the government to spend an additional $3 billion for the next census. 2. What should have been done that was not done? Better planning and communication with contractors; precisely define initial requirements; control requirements creep and cost overruns. Top management in the Bureau early on failed to assess and mitigate the inherent risks in such a major project. Trial tests could have uncovered issues like complexity of use and inability to transmit large amounts of data. 3. Were any problems unforeseeable? No. 4. Consider the statement: “Hope is not a plan.” Does the statement apply to this project failure? Explain why or why not. Answers may vary. Given the lack of good planning, management, and oversight, yes. 5. What are the similarities between the U.S .Census project failure and the DIA automated baggage-handling project failure? Answers may vary. Both were huge projects; highly automated, state-of-the-art high tech; costly; extremely complex, risky, and subject to delays; delays added costs; both projects scaled down then scrapped later; each was poorly planned; each encountered scope creep.
Image of page 1
Review Questions 13.1 The Systems Development Lifecycle (SDLC ) 1. What are the five stages of the SDLC? The System Development Life Cycle (SDLC) stages are planning; analysis; design; implementation/testing, and support/maintenance. Each stage consists of well-defined tasks based on the scope of the project. The SDLC is an iterative process, not a linear one. This means that when results from one stage are assessed they can be revised, if needed, and a previous stage can be revisited before continuing onto the next stage. 2. Name the deliverables from three of the five SDLC stages. Answers may vary. Planning: Examples can include development of project management plan, planning documents, etc. Analysis: Examples can include development of user requirements, create functional requirements, etc. Design: Examples can include complete detailed systems design document, etc. Implementation/Testing: Examples can include delivery of a complete information system into production environment and includes creating and testing Planning Planning Analysis Analysis Design Design Implementation /Testing Implementation /Testing Support /Maintenance Support /Maintenance
Image of page 2
databases, creating test case procedures, preparing test files, resolution of problems, etc.
Image of page 3
Image of page 4

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture