Music&Speech [Compatibility Mode]

Music&Speech [Compatibility Mode] - Music and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Music and Speech perception Structures of Music •Notes • Chords •Melodies and Rhythms • Symphonies Frequency ranges of musical instruments
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Complex tones A complex tone can be decomposed into a multitude of simple sine waves and is characteristic of musical instruments Fundamental frequency: the component of a complex tone that has the lowest frequency Harmonics (or overtones): the components of a complex tone that are Harmonics (or overtones): the components of a complex tone that are multiples of the fundamental frequency For example, a musical tone A3 contains the fundamental frequency of 220 Hz and harmonics of 440 Hz, 880 Hz and 1320 Hz. Some instruments, notably flute and piccolo, produce very few harmonics of low amplitude, and sound pure. Other instruments, such as the guitar, have many high-amplitude harmonics and therefore sound thick and rich. Perception of Timbre Factors influencing the timbre of a musical tone: – Harmonics – Attack A musical tone has three sections during the time it is played: (1) the attack, or the beginning buildup of a tone; (2) the steady state, or the middle portion of a tone; and (3) the decay, or decrease in amplitude at the end of a tone Tonal Structures in Music The perceived quality of musical tones has a helix (2-dimensional) rather than linear (one-dimenstional) structure. Tone height refers to the increase in pitch that accompanies an increase in frequency Tone chroma refers to the perceived similarity shared by different musical tones. The same named tones (e.g., A 1 and A 2 ) are one or more octaves apart, meaning that one tone is multiples in frequency of another tone.
Background image of page 2
3 Cultural variations in music scales and tone perception • Javanese music scales
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/25/2011 for the course PSYCHOLOGY 361 taught by Professor Lou during the Spring '10 term at Grand Valley State University.

Page1 / 10

Music&Speech [Compatibility Mode] - Music and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online