DescriptiveStatistics 4

DescriptiveStatistics 4 - Frequency Tables and Central...

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Frequency Tables and Central Tendency
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Example How stressed have you been in the last 2 weeks? Scale: 0 (not at all) to 10 (as stressed as possible) 4 7 7 7 8 8 7 8 9 4 7 3 6 9 10 5 7 10 6 8 7 8 7 8 7 4 5 10 10 0 9 8 3 7 9 7 9 5 8 5 0 4 6 6 7 5 3 2 8 5 10 9 10 6 4 8 8 8 4 8 7 3 7 8 8 8 7 9 7 5 6 3 4 8 7 5 7 3 3 6 5 7 5 7 8 8 7 10 5 4 3 7 6 3 9 7 8 5 7 9 9 3 1 8 6 6 4 8 5 10 4 8 10 5 5 4 9 4 7 7 7 6 6 4 4 4 9 7 10 4 7 5 10 7 9 2 7 5 9 10 3 7 2 5 9 8 10 10 6 8 3 from Aron & Aron’s text, Statistics for Psychology
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Making a Frequency Table Step 1 - order the possible values from highest to lowest Step 2 - tally the scores Step 3 - add the tallies
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Frequency Tables A frequency table shows how often each value of the variable occurs Stress rating Frequency 10 14 9 15 8 26 7 31 6 13 5 18 4 16 3 12 2 3 1 1 0 2
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Grouped Frequency Table Stress rating Frequency 10 – 11 14 8 – 9 41 6 –7 44 4 – 5 34 2 – 3 15 0 – 1 3 Sometimes we have a large number of possible values or large gaps with a frequency of 0 between scores. In these cases, it is often best to use a Grouped Frequency Table
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Steps for making a frequency polygon 1 – make a frequency table 2 – put values on bottom of page (the X-axis) 3 – label the X-axis (e.g., “test score”, “stress rating”) 4 – put frequencies on left edge of page (the Y-axis) 5 – label the Y-axis ( “frequency”) 6 – mark a point above each value at frequency level 7 – connect the points
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Frequency Polygon
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Steps for making a histogram 1 – make a frequency table 2 – put values on bottom of page (the X-axis) 3 – label the X-axis (e.g., “test score”, “stress rating”) 4 – put frequencies on left edge of page (the Y-axis) 5 – label the Y-axis ( “frequency”) 6 – make a bar for each value
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Histogram
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Suppose your score on a psychology exam was 87%, and on physics exam was 70% Which score is better? Which score is better, compared to others’
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This note was uploaded on 05/26/2011 for the course PSCH 343 taught by Professor Victoriaharmon during the Spring '11 term at Ill. Chicago.

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DescriptiveStatistics 4 - Frequency Tables and Central...

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