Anderson, PROJECT MATURITY IN ORGANISATIONS

Anderson, PROJECT MATURITY IN ORGANISATIONS - PROJECT...

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PROJECT MATURITY IN ORGANISATIONS By Erling S. Andersen Professor of Information Systems and Project Management Norwegian School of Management BI P.O.Box 580, N-1302 Sandvika, Norway erling.s.andersen@bi.no and Svein Arne Jessen Professor of Project Management Norwegian School of Management BI P.O.Box 580, N-1302 Sandvika, Norway svein.a.jessen@bi.no Project Maturity in Organisations 15/04/02 Page 1 of 14
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Project Maturity in Organisations Abstract The paper presents research on project maturity in organisations. The purpose is to develop an understanding of what project maturity is and to investigate the level of project maturity in organisations today. The hypothesis is that project maturity develops through a maturity ladder where the ladder steps are proposed to be project management, program management, and portfolio management. Maturity itself is measured along three dimensions. They are knowledge (capability to carry out different tasks), attitudes (willingness to carry them out), and actions (actually doing them). The different dimensions of maturity are further divided into sub-concepts, which should provide a good understanding of the project maturity of an organisation. A questionnaire is developed based on a preliminary understanding of project maturity, and an initial survey has been conducted. The survey gives some support to the ladder construct, and shows that attitudes and knowledge are stronger than the actions taken. Further work on the questionnaire and surveys are proposed. Key words : project maturity, maturity ladder, knowledge, attitude, action Project Maturity in Organisations 15/04/02 Page 2 of 14
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Introduction The field of project management has extended its focus from study of a single project to the way the company or organisation is using projects to achieve its goals. Gareis (1989) has long ago coined the concept of the Project-Oriented Organisation (POO). The specific feature of such an organisation is that the management of single projects, the management of network of internal and external projects, and the relationships between the company and the single projects are considered. Today projects are seen as far more than solving of technical problems; they are also venues for mastering business and change. PMI is working on its OPMM (Organizational Project Management Model) (Schlichter, 2002). The aim of its work is to increase the domain of project management beyond the delivery of the single project. As shown by PMI (2002), many maturity models exist. Such models illustrate that there are differences among companies in their capability to use projects as a mean to achieve objectives. However, many of these models are rather limited in scope, having as their sole intention a description of the actual level of project maturity. Our research agenda is to create a deeper understanding of project maturity within
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Anderson, PROJECT MATURITY IN ORGANISATIONS - PROJECT...

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