Project Management Maturity Models, towards best practices for virtual teams

Project Management Maturity Models, towards best practices for virtual teams

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Project Management Maturity Models: Towards Best Practices for Virtual Teams Martin Pazderka, PMP, Member, IEEE <martin.pazderka@inso.tuwien.ac.at> Thomas Grechenig <thomas.grechenig@inso.tuwien.ac.at> Vienna University of Technology Institute ofComputer Aided Automation, Research Group for Industrial Software (INSO) Abstract- Within the project management community, the concept of project management maturity models has recently been receiving a lot of business and research attention. Although the structure of most models has now been well defined and is quite sophisticated, a lot of potential exists in extending the currently described best practices that are part of these models by additions for specific problem areas, such as working with virtual (geographically distributed) teams. This paper describes the challenges faced by those working with virtual teams in the context of project management maturity models, establishes a strategy how these models can be extended to address these challenges, and identifies a set of best practices for virtual team collaboration that can be integrated into current maturity models. I. INTRODUCTION M any technically oriented organizations have recognized that in today's highly dynamic business landscape, the project management function is becoming more and more important, and some of them have even discovered the benefits of a project management oriented overall management paradigm: Managing major parts their operations using a project-oriented methodology (i.e. "Management by Projects" [1]) allows companies to perform controlling, business and financial evaluations all the way down to the level of their individual projects, e.g. by providing key indicator feedback, as well as ongoing performance and progress evaluation on a portfolio, program and project level [2]. This helps to streamline operations by weeding out unprofitable projects as well as keeping the necessary management attention on the profitable ones. However, to reap the most benefits, organizations need to gain full control and measurability their project management processes, allowing them to use maturity models to benchmark them against industry-established best practices in order to avoid a competitive disadvantage [3], or even to just survive on the market [4]. Using maturity models helps 84 978-1-4244-2146-6/08/$25.00 ©2008 IEEE organizations find out how efficient and sophisticated their approach to project management is compared to the industry, and determine in which areas further improvement is possible and/or necessary [5]. Another recent development which can be attributed to increasing geographic distribution of project operations is the continuing "virtualization" of project teams. Currently, little research exists that is concerned with the impact of this virtualization on the processes and best practices championed by project management maturity models. It is therefore the aim of this paper to investigate how the introduction of virtual teams may change certain aspects ofmaturity models.
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Project Management Maturity Models, towards best practices for virtual teams

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