Study Guide 5 PowerPoint

Study Guide 5 PowerPoint - ArtHistoryandthe Cinema Quiz5...

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Art History and the  Cinema Quiz 5
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What is Realism?  Realism refers to a mid-19th century cultural movement with its roots in  France, where it was a very popular art form around the mid to late 1800s.  It came about with the introduction of photography - a new visual source  that created a desire for people to produce things that look “objectively real.”  It represented real subject matter, such as the poor and the oppressed,  although it often depicted them with forceful blobs of color and a fondness  for browns. This means that some of the pictures do not actually look  photographically real, but have a very powerful look because of the  application of color and representation of the people. Realism was heavily against romanticism, a genre dominating French  literature and artwork in the late 18th and early 19th century. Undistorted by  personal bias, Realism believed in the ideology of objective reality and  revolted against exaggerated emotionalism.  Truth and social consciousness became the goals of many Realists. This  movement is also referred to as Heroic Materialism.
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Who is Gustave Courbet?  (1819-1877)  Courbet is the painter most directly  associated with Realism. He believed  that artists could accurately represent  only their own experience. He rejected  historical painting, as well as the  Romantic depiction of exotic locales and  revivals of the past.  Courbet believed that art could not be  taught. One needed individual  inspiration, fueled by study and  observation. “Show me an angel and I’ll  paint one.” 
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Courbet, The Stone Breakers 1849  This painting reflects the impact of socialist ideas on his  iconography. It depicts two workers, one breaking up stones with  a hammer and the other lifting a heavy rock.  These figures evoke the Romantic nostalgia for a simple  existence, but also show the mindless, repetitive character of  physical labor born of poverty. 
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Who is Joseph Niépce? (1765-1833) Niépce discovered a way to  make the image from a  camera obscura remain on  the surface.  This process was called  fixing the image; however,  the need for long exposure  time (eight hours) made it  impractical.  These were the first types  of photographs produced.
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Who is Louis Daguerre? 
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This note was uploaded on 05/26/2011 for the course CLAS 300 taught by Professor Soren during the Spring '08 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

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Study Guide 5 PowerPoint - ArtHistoryandthe Cinema Quiz5...

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