Chapter 8 - Chapter 8 MEMORY End Competency H List and...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 8 MEMORY End Competency H. List and define three types of memory Memory • Refers to the capacity to retain and retrieve information • Memory = competence & personal identity • Memory gives us a past & guides our future • Memory is selective (avoids mental junk) • Memory is reconstructive- we alter it in ways that help us make sense of the material • Reconstructing draw on many sources (direct recollection, family stories, photographs, home videos, accounts from other people’s experiences, TV, etc.) Source misattribution- Not able to distinguish your actual memory from information you got elsewhere Flashbulb Memories • Vivid recollections of emotional events • Unusual, shocking or tragic events • Survival value • Not always complete or accurate • Studies show confidence remains higher for flashbulb, but contain just as many inconsistent details as everyday memories Confabulation • Confusing an event that happened to someone else with one that happened to you, or believing something that never happened 1. Thought or heard imagined event many times 2. Longer think about= more details More details = more certain 3. Easy to imagine because familiar 4. Focus on your emotional reaction then what actually happened Memory is vulnerable to suggestion Eyewitnesses are more likely to make misidentifications when: • Suspect’s ethnicity differs from own • Leading questions, suggestive comments and misleading information affect memories of witnessed and own experiences Children’s Testimony • Like adults, children can be influenced by leading questions and suggestions 1. When interviewer strongly believes child has been molested 2. Doesn’t accept child’s denial of having been molested (encourage allegations) 3. Encourage imagination inflation 4. Repeated questions 5. Claim that everyone else said •...
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Chapter 8 - Chapter 8 MEMORY End Competency H List and...

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