WT 4e, chap 12-Treatment - chapter 12 ApproachestoTreatment...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Approaches to Treatment  and Therapy chapter 12
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Overview Biological treatments Kinds of psychotherapy Evaluating psychotherapy chapter 12
Background image of page 2
Antipsychotic drugs Many block or reduce sensitivity of dopamine  receptors. Some increase levels of serotonin, a neurotransmitter  that inhibits dopamine activity Can relieve positive symptoms of schizophrenia, but  ineffective—or even worsen—negative symptoms chapter 12
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Antidepressant drugs Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI’s) Elevate norepinephrine and serotonin in brain by blocking an enzyme that  deactivates these neurotransmitters Tricyclic antidepressants Boost norepinephrine and serotonin by preventing reuptake Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI’s) Boost serotonin by preventing reuptake Herbs such as St. John’s Wort have also been used. chapter 12
Background image of page 4
Tranquilizers Increase the activity of GABA Developed for treatment of mild anxiety Often prescribed inappropriately by general  practitioners for any patient mood complaints chapter 12
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Lithium carbonate Used to treat bipolar disorder Moderates levels of norepinephrine by protecting  cells from being overstimulated by neurotransmitter  glutamate Must be given in right dose, bloodstream levels  monitored Newer treatments include Tegetrol and Depakote. chapter 12
Background image of page 6
Your turn Your friend has largely withdrawn from social activities,  and has stopped maintaining her appearance or  apartment.  If she goes to see a doctor, what do you  expect her doctor to prescribe? 1.  An MAOI 2.  An SSRI (e.g., Prozac) 3.  A tranquilizer (e.g., Valium) 4.  Lithium carbonate chapter 12
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Your turn Your friend has largely withdrawn from social activities,  and has stopped maintaining her appearance or  apartment.  If she goes to see a doctor, what do you  expect her doctor to prescribe? 1.  An MAOI 2.  An SSRI (e.g., Prozac) 3.  A tranquilizer (e.g., Valium) 4.  Lithium carbonate chapter 12
Background image of page 8
Placebo effect The apparent success of a treatment due to patient’s  expectation rather than the treatment itself
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/26/2011 for the course PSYCH 101 taught by Professor Carawilliams during the Summer '10 term at Moraine Valley Community College.

Page1 / 35

WT 4e, chap 12-Treatment - chapter 12 ApproachestoTreatment...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online