RELATIONSHIPS - RELATIONSHIPS F lick to edit Master...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 5/26/11 RELATIONSHIPS
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5/26/11 Discussion What is an adult friend? How do we select our friends? How do the quantity and
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5/26/11 Friendships Predominantly based on feelings of reciprocity and choice. Less emotional or intense than love relationships Good friendships tend to boost self-esteem Identifiable stages (ABCDE) -Acquaintanceship -Buildup -Continuation
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5/26/11 Friendships Life transitions usually result in fewer friends and less contact More friends during young adulthood than any other time Life satisfaction is strongly related to the quantity and quality of friendships College students with friends adjust better to stressful life events Having at least 1 very close friend or confidant provides a buffer against the
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5/26/11 Friendships Older women have more friends and more intimate friendships than older men Women are in a better place to deal with the stresses of life Three Dimensions of Friendships 1. Emotional- self-disclosure, intimacy, trust, affection, etc. 2. Shared/Communal- support activities of
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5/26/11 Cultural Differences Vancouver, Canada base friendships on feelings and cognitive processes Greensboro, NC focus on behaviors (what they do for one another) and similarity
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5/26/11 Women place more importance on sibling ties across adulthood than do men Older adults tend to have fewer friendships and develop fewer new relationships than people in midlife
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5/26/11 Socioemotional Selectivity Social contact is motivated by a variety of goals 1. Information seeking 2. Self-concept 3. Emotional regulation
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5/26/11 Older Adults vs. Young Adults Information seeking is the main goal for young adults Emotional regulation is the major goal for older adults People tend to be highly selective when the goal is emotional regulation People tend to become increasing selective with whom they have contact with as they age Explains why older adults tend not to
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5/26/11 Men vs. Women Women base friendships more on intimate and emotional sharing Men tend to base friendships on shared activities or interests Confiding in others is inconsistent with competing Usually men’s friendships are less intimate Women have more close relationships than men do
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5/26/11 Cross-sex Friendships Man/Woman friendships have a greater benefit for men Men tend to over perceive and women tend to underperceive sexual interest Once in exclusive dating relationship maintaining these relationships becomes very difficult
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5/26/11 Love Relationships STERNBERG Passion Intimacy Commitment As length of relationship increases, passion and intimacy
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5/26/11 Love over time Passion fades if emotional intimacy is not developed, the relationship will end Couples that marry at the point of infatuation are more likely to divorce By spending time together, making
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This note was uploaded on 05/26/2011 for the course PSY 210 taught by Professor Carawilliams during the Spring '11 term at Moraine Valley Community College.

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RELATIONSHIPS - RELATIONSHIPS F lick to edit Master...

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