The Electoral System - Litigation Litigation is one tactic...

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Litigation Litigation is one tactic equally available to insiders and outsiders Tools: o Initiate cases to overturn policy or delay implementation o File Amicus Curiae Briefs o Provide Attorneys o Influence Judicial Appointments What is a PAC? In their modern form, PACs are a creation of the Federal Election Campaign Act (FECA) of 1971 (amended 1974) The maximum contribution is $5000 per candidate per election or $15000 per party Maximum contribution for individuals: $2000 per election The Growth of PACs The # of PACs grew dramatically in the first decade of FECA, but leveled out in the 1980’s Similar pattern found in political contributions by PACs Much variety in the PAC universe in terms of size, activity, and nature of goals The PAC Dilemma Allegations of “Vote Buying” Evidence to support this view: mostly anecdotal or circumstantial Most agree, however, that money does buy access Most contributions go to incumbents Qualifications for Office House o 25 years of age o A citizen for at least 7 years
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This note was uploaded on 05/26/2011 for the course POLS 1101 taught by Professor Cann during the Spring '08 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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The Electoral System - Litigation Litigation is one tactic...

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