The Federal System

The Federal System - Qualifications of a Federal System A...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Qualifications of a Federal System A government must have constitutional relations across levels that satisfy three general conditions: 1) The same people and territory are included in both levels of government. 2) The nation's constitution protects units at each level of government from encroachment by other units. 3) Each unit is in a position to exert some leverage over the other. The second condition, independence , sets the stage for the third condition, mutual independence . The constitution and local government. Dillon's Rule: power of local government is given by the state. Advantages of Federalism Protection of Liberty Dispersion of Power Increasing Participation Improving Efficiency Ensuring Policy Responsiveness Encouraging Policy Innovation Managing Conflict Reservations Concerning Federalism Observation of Action on National Issues Civil Rights Sacrificing National Interests to Local Interests Disposal of Nuclear Waste Costs and Benefits of Government Spread Unevenly Taxation Most Important Concept Movement over time from a state-centered division of power to a national-centered system of government. Original Design of Federalism Delegated (Enumerated) Powers Article 1, Section 8 National Supremacy Concurrent Powers Taxes Powers Denied to the States Interstate Commerce
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 4

The Federal System - Qualifications of a Federal System A...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online