Chapter10 - Chapter10 EffectiveGroupsandTeams...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 10 Effective Groups and Teams
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Stanford Leadership in Focus Video Motivating Teams: Building Trust
Background image of page 2
Types of Groups in  Organizations
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Types of Groups in Organizations  (cont’d) Functional Group A permanent group created to accomplish a  number of organizational purposes within an  indefinite time horizon. Informal or Interest Group A group created by its own members for  purposes that may or may not be relevant to  organizational goals. Task Group A group created by the organization to  accomplish a relatively narrow range of purposes  within a stated time horizon.
Background image of page 4
Types of Teams Source:  “Types of Teams” adapted from Brian Dumaine, “The Trouble with Teams,”  Fortune,  September 5, 1994.  Copyright © 1994 Time, Inc. All rights reserved Problem-solving team Most popular team type; comprises knowledge workers who gather to solve a problem and then disband. Management team Consists mainly of managers from various functional areas who coordinate the work among other teams. Work team Are responsible for the daily work of the organization; when empowered, they are self-managed teams. Virtual team A new type of team that interacts by computer; member enters and leaves the network as needed and may take turns serving as leader. Quality circle Declining in popularity, quality circles, comprising of workers and supervisors, meet intermittently to discuss workplace problems.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Why People Join Groups Goal accomplishment The groups’ goals motivate them to join. Personal identity We have confidence in what they say Affiliation Friendship, social stimulation, personal acceptance Emotional support Handle the pressures of daily living
Background image of page 6
Stages of Group Development
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Stages of Group Development, cont. Orientation (Forming) Attempting to define the task and how it will  be accomplished through discussions of  task-related concepts/issues. Confrontation (Storming) Intragroup competition, leaders emerge  and the formation of factions; arguing  among members, even when they agree.
Background image of page 8
Stages of Group Development, cont. Differentiation (Norming) 
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/26/2011 for the course MGMT 3000 taught by Professor Roberthirschfeld during the Spring '08 term at University of Georgia Athens.

Page1 / 30

Chapter10 - Chapter10 EffectiveGroupsandTeams...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online