Positives of African Resources

Positives of African Resources - an average of 12.3 percent...

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Positives of African Resources Resource positives : in 1999, 1/5 of Africans lived in war-torn countries. There are no current major conflicts despite fighting in some hotspots. Conflicts in Sierra Leone and Angola ended with peace deals in 2001. Liberia's war ended in 2003, electing the continent’s first female president, Ellen Johnson- Sirleaf, in 2006. In Côte d'Ivoire, there is an uneasy peace after the 2002 armed rebellion divided the country in two. Foreign troops (UN and AU) help maintain peace. In the DRC, a 2002 peace deal has resulted in a ceasefire, except for pockets in the east. In Sudan, peace talks between the central government and the rebels in the south led to the end of a two-decade war and the formation of a Southern Sudanese government, although the Darfur region conflict has continued unabated. At independence in 1966, Botswana was one of the poorest countries in the world, but it is now a upper- middle income developing country,with the highest rate of annual growth of any country in the world—
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Unformatted text preview: an average of 12.3 percent GDP per capita over 20 of the 35 years since the country's diamond cache was discovered in 1967. Botswana has used much of its wealth to invest in public services. By 1996, it had the second-highest level of per capita spending on education in the world. Improvements in child mortality have been spectacular, falling from 13.9 percent in 1970 to 4.8 percent in 1998, though improvements are now threatened by HIV/AIDS. Best of all, the African Union has agreed under a new peacekeeping mandate to intervene in members' conflicts. The problem of disarmament is ongoing, many countries at peace are plagued with instability while fighting and economic exploitation continues. Investors are ready and willing, but allowing international investment before exploitation has ended and justice brought, is likely to sow the seeds of further corruption and war...
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This note was uploaded on 05/26/2011 for the course AFST 2100 taught by Professor Ojo during the Spring '10 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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