Chapter_6_Revolution_Within_(student) - Chapter 6 The Revolution Within Part 1(220-238 1 How did the successful American Revolution challenge ingrained

Chapter_6_Revolution_Within_(student) - Chapter 6 The...

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Chapter 6 The Revolution Within Part 1 (220-238) 1) How did the successful American Revolution challenge ingrained social and political norms? The success of the Revolution meant building a whole new independent structure, distinct from the British rule. America was looking for democracy, equality, and freedom, something that wasn’t necessarily considered normal back then. Before independence, the church and state influenced each other, only a small percent of people could vote, people with different religious backgrounds were persecuted and there was a very distinct and brutal social system. The Revolution was after changing all of these social and political norms. Thomas Jefferson wrote the Bill for the Establishing Religious Freedom that was passed in 1786. This allowed people to practice any religion they wanted, or not be religious at all. This was a huge step from the standard “Christian-only states.” The church and state were also separated so that they didn't influence each other. Churches weren’t as powerful as they were considered to be in England. All religions, except for Jews, such as Quakers, Baptists, Catholics were allowed to vote unlike during British rule. Suffrage didn’t only pertain to landowning white men anymore, but instead landowning women, African Americans, and people with different religions. Even though this doesn’t seem democratic in today’s world, it was a huge step for Americans back then. The United States had become a symbol of liberty and freedom. 2) What was contentious about the requirements for voting and officeholding in the post-war period? The requirements for voting and officeholding in the post-war period caused a lot of controversies between the conservative patriots and the radical democrats. Conservatives believed that they should stick to the old voting rules where only men who were landowners could vote. They believed that anyone who didn’t have “judgment of their own” couldn’t vote; Slaves, servants, tenants, adult sons living in the homes of their parents, the poor, and women all fell under this category. John Adams was a proponent of this conservative view on suffrage. On the other hand, the Democrats wanted to break down the walls around all of the social norms, including voting rights, social statuses, and religion. All the states had to find the perfect balance between conservative and democratic views in voting and officeholding in
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the post-war period. But as time progressed, the states started becoming more and more democratic. 3) What impact did the American Revolution have on religious tolerance? The American Revolution was a huge step towards liberty, and this included religious freedom. The War of Independence had diminished the idea of anti-Catholicism in America due to their alliance with Catholic France and also Canada who had adopted Catholicism. After the American victory, the people started accepting Catholics as they played a huge role in independence. Besides Catholicism, all kinds of Christianity was now accepted. Quakers, Baptists and other Protestants of the Angelic Church
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