ch07student - Chapter 7 Chapter SocialandEmotional...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 7 Chapter 7 Social and Emotional  Development in Infancy and  Toddlerhood This multimedia product and its contents are protected under copyright law. The following are prohibited by law: •Any public performance or display, including transmission of any image over a network; •Preparation of any derivative work, including the extraction, in whole or in part, of any images; •Any rental, lease, or lending of the program.
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Developing a Sense of Trust Developing a Sense of Trust Eriksonian viewpoint 1 st  year of life Trust requires Physical comfort Minimal fear A predictable, consistent and accepting  caregiver
Image of page 2
Smiling Smiling Endogenous smiles Smile that is triggered by change in nervous  system activity  Exogenous smiles Smile that is triggered by external stimuli Emerges at 2-3 weeks
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Smiling Smiling Social smile Smile triggered by social stimuli 6-8 weeks Instrumental smiling Smiling to achieve a goal 10 weeks Smiling is a genetic adaptation that  promotes close contact and emotional ties
Image of page 4
Laughter Laughter Appears at 4 months  in response to  physical stimulation At 6 months, infants  laugh in response to  visual and social  stimuli Photo credit of Gabriela Martorell.
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Social Referencing Social Referencing Using caregivers as a source of  information about how to respond to an  uncertain emotional situation or condition
Image of page 6
Crying Crying Communicate their needs Reflex response with survival value which  slowly becomes volitional
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Types of Cries Types of Cries Basic cry Anger cry  Pain cry Hunger cry
Image of page 8
Source of Stimulation Source of Stimulation Neonatal period Infants cry  Primarily because of physical needs For no apparent reason Later infancy Crying is related to cognitive and emotional  conditions (e.g. scared, angry)
Image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Cultural Issues Cultural Issues People have different responses to crying  infants Some cultures discourage crying Some cultures do not discourage crying
Image of page 10
Anger Anger Developmental course 9 months Infants develop a sense of control Anger and temper tantrums emerge out of  frustration 12 months Infants become aware of and frustrated by limits
Image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Contributing Changes to Contributing Changes to Anger Expression
Image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern