martin2e_ppt_ch10 - Chapter 10 Chapter SocialandEmotional...

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Chapter 10 Chapter 10 Social and Emotional  Development in Early  Childhood This multimedia product and its contents are protected under copyright law. The following are prohibited by law: •Any public performance or display, including transmission of any image over a network; •Preparation of any derivative work, including the extraction, in whole or in part, of any images; •Any rental, lease, or lending of the program.
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Initiative versus Guilt Initiative versus Guilt Based on Erikson’s theories of  psychosocial crises Initiative A willingness to take on responsibilities and  learn new skills Guilt Involving feelings of failure and becoming  anxious when trying new things
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Initiative versus Guilt Initiative versus Guilt Results from Increasing physical, cognitive and social skills  in children Formulation of own plans and goals Parental or social rules that sometimes run  counter to individual desires
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Self-Concept Self-Concept An individual’s beliefs  about the attributes  and capacities he or  she possesses Appears at  approximately age 2 Insert Image #EED_090 from  Getty Images, CD EP036 “Early  Education”
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Self-Concept Self-Concept Developmental trends Global to differentiated External qualities to psychological attributes Concrete to abstract Initially all-or-none Unstable descriptions to stable descriptions  over time and situation
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Self-Esteem Self-Esteem The value an  individual attaches to  the mental picture of  himself or herself Based on  How others treat them The child’s particular  behaviors and  achievements insert pic from page 301 in text Add credit line:  Mary Kate Denny/ Getty
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Self-Esteem Self-Esteem Young children Self-esteem revolves around feeling good or bad  Judgments are often global and vary depending on  situation Older children Social comparison appears Judgments become differentiated depending on task  Greater focus on uniqueness 
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Self-Esteem Self-Esteem Combination of  Worthiness (feelings of being valued) Competence (feelings of being effective) Results in 4 types of self-esteem
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Self-Esteem Self-Esteem High self-esteem High worthiness, high competence Children are well-equipped to face challenge Low self-esteem Low worthiness, low competence Produces feelings of unhappiness and anxiety
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Developing a Concept of Gender Gender identity Understanding and  accepting that one is a  boy or a girl Occurs in stages insert pic from page 304  of text. Add credit line: 
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martin2e_ppt_ch10 - Chapter 10 Chapter SocialandEmotional...

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