Politics and the Civil Rights Progression of the LGBTQ Community

Politics and the Civil Rights Progression of the LGBTQ Community

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Unformatted text preview: Politics and the Civil Rights Progression of the LGBTQ Community Hannah Brooks POS 5932 Dr. Larry Wright 26 July 2010 Introduction Dr. Laura Schlessinger once wrote that “too many people make the past their identity and spend the rest of their lives accumulating sympathy for their past pain.” In saying this she was attempting to explain the psychological ins and outs of thought processes between glass ceilings individuals and communities create for themselves. She argues that instead of pushing forward for progress, or attempting to fix the damage done by the past detriments, often, people are prone to seeking attention. It is more likely that one would like rather staying in one spot and be shown sympathy, than move forward to ensure that the past does not repeat itself. Although this was mostly used in the context of personal romantic relationships as well as personal career progress this is also applicable to the social progress of minority groups. For example, the current state of the black community is often said to be at a stand still for this very reason. Its members look past the progress of the civil rights movements and still harp on the hurt caused by slavery and the Jim Crow Era. According to Schlessinger’s logic, the community should rather look at the civil rights movement as inspiration and motivation to continue to move forward. The status of inferiority should be recognized and fought as opposed to recognized and accepted. A community who has not made nearly the same strides of progress is now challenging this same complacency. The lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) community is a group of minorities not generally recognized as minorities, but still marginalized as such. The inability of America to grant rights to the LGBTQ community is a sign of a much more deeply rooted desire and need for humans to always create a social structure that clearly establishes who is inferior and who is superior. The discomfort towards the gay community seems to be more strongly directed to the idea of its members being accepted as equals in society. The rights being pursued by the community are not grandiose or spectacular by any mans. The LGBTQ rights issues most urgently discussed on the policy forefront are employment rights, marriage, housing, and adoption rights, as well as legal protection from hate crimes. These rights are the most basic of sanctioned privileges for American citizens, and ignoring an entire community is clearly separating it from the whole of the American experience. Although great progress has been made since the Stonewall riots, the LGBTQ community remains in the bottom caste of American social stratification....
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This note was uploaded on 05/27/2011 for the course POS 5117 taught by Professor Dr.inamete during the Fall '10 term at Florida A&M.

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Politics and the Civil Rights Progression of the LGBTQ Community

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