Lecture 24_Chapter21_23 (Fall2008)

Lecture 24_Chapter21_23 (Fall2008) - Plan Lecture 24:...

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1 Lecture 24: Chapters 21 and 23 Elements of Chemistry Plan I. Submicroscopic World: Atoms and Molecules II. Physical and Chemical Properties: What is the difference? III. Chemical Compounds and Reactions IV. Chemical Bonding - Ionic Bonds - Covalent Bonds Home Work: z Chapter 21 z Key Terms z Review questions: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16 z Exercises: 10, 13, 14 z Chapter 23 Key terms Review questions: 1, 4, 7, 9, 12, 16, 17, 19, 24, 28 I. Submicroscopic World: Atoms and Molecules Different levels of magnification Macroscopic physical objects that are measurable and observable by the naked eye. Microscopic Objects that can be seen and studied with microscopes. Submicroscopic The realm of atoms and molecules, where objects are smaller than can be detected by optical microscopes.
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2 II. Physical and Chemical Properties: What is the difference? z Physical properties Properties that describe the look or feel of a substance, such as color, hardness texture and phase hardness, texture, and phase . z Chemical properties Properties that describe how one substance reacts with others or how a substance transforms. III. Chemical Compounds and Reactions z Any change in a substance that involves a rearrangement of the way its atoms are bonded is called a chemical change or chemical reaction. z A chemical bond is the attraction between two atoms that holds them together in molecule Chemical Compounds z A chemical compound is a substance consisting of two or more elements chemically bonded together in a fixed proportion by mass. z A compound is represented by its chemical formula (NaCl – sodium chloride, H 2 O – water, CO 2 carbon dioxide, etc.) Compounds compared to mixtures Compounds have physical and chemical properties that are different from the properties of their elemental components. Distinguish a compound from a mixture! A mixture's properties are generally similar or related to the properties of its constituents .
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This note was uploaded on 05/27/2011 for the course PSC 1121 taught by Professor Khankasayev during the Fall '08 term at Florida A&M.

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Lecture 24_Chapter21_23 (Fall2008) - Plan Lecture 24:...

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