chap4 - Chapter 4 Requirements Engineering Chapter 4...

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Chapter 4 Requirements Engineering Slide 1 Chapter 4 Requirements Engineering
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Chapter 4 Requirements Engineering Slide 2 Topics covered Why RE is hard Functional and non-functional requirements Product vs. organizational vs. external requirements Domain requirements Requirements specification The software requirements document Requirements uses User vs. system requirements specification (cont’d)
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Chapter 4 Requirements Engineering Slide 3 Topics covered (cont’d) Requirements engineering processes Requirements elicitation and analysis Requirements validation Requirements management
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Chapter 4 Requirements Engineering Slide 4 Requirements engineering (RE) The process of eliciting, analyzing, documenting, and validating the services required of a system and the constraints under which it will operate and be developed. Descriptions of these services and constraints are the requirement specifications for the system.
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Chapter 4 Requirements Engineering Slide 5 RE is both very hard and critical The hardest single part of building a software system is deciding precisely what to build . No other part of the conceptual work is as difficult… No other part of the work so cripples the resulting system if done wrong. No other part is more difficult to rectify later. – Fred Brooks, “No Silver Bullet…”
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Chapter 4 Requirements Engineering Slide 6 Why is RE so hard? Difficulty of anticipation Unknown or conflicting requirements / priorities (“I’ll know what I want when I see it.”) Conflicts between & among users and procurers Fragmented nature of requirements Complexity / number of distinct requirements
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Chapter 4 Requirements Engineering Slide 7 an·tic·i·pa·tion [an-tis-uh- pey -shuhn] noun , 14th century 1. a prior action that takes into account or forestalls a later action; 2. the act of looking forward; 3. visualization of a future event or state. We can never know about the days to come, but we think about them anyway…Anticipation, anticipation is makin' me late, Is keepin' me waitin’. -Carly Simon
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Chapter 4 Requirements Engineering Slide 8 Why is RE so hard? Difficulty of anticipation Unknown or conflicting requirements / priorities (“I’ll know what I want when I see it.”) Conflicts between & among users and procurers Fragmented nature of requirements Complexity / number of distinct requirements for large or complex systems
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Chapter 4 Requirements Engineering Slide 9 Why is RE so hard? (cont’d) Some analogies: Working a dynamically changing jigsaw puzzle Blind men describing an elephant Different medical specialists describing an ill patient
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Chapter 4 Requirements Engineering Slide 10 Functional versus non-functional requirements Functional requirements services the system should provide, how it should react to particular inputs, or how it should behave in particular situations.
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chap4 - Chapter 4 Requirements Engineering Chapter 4...

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