hallucination guide - SECTION III INTERRUPTIN G THE...

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Unformatted text preview: SECTION III INTERRUPTIN G THE HALLUCINATORY PROCESS (Clack, i962) Establish a trustingz integpersonai relationship. If you want the individual to open up, you must express feelings in an open, honest and direct manner. You will elicit the behavior you emit-~if you are frightened, the individual will be more frightened. Try to have a consistent routine as possible. Be patient, Show acceptance and LISTEN. (REMEMBER: The individual is experiencing anxiety, fear, loneliness, low self— esteem and the brain is not processing stimuli accurately.) Look and listen for cues (symptoms) and evidence of the hallucination. This may include grinning or laughter which is inappropriate, moving lips without sound, rapid biinking, slow verbal responses, silence or frequent telephone calls. Be patient and LISTEN. Focus on the one and elicit the individual's observation and description. The goal is to empower individuals by helping them understand the symptoms they are experiencing or demonstrating. This helps an individual gain control of his own iliness, seek help and try to prevent the hallucination from reaching stages three and four. Be patient and LISTEN. Identify if the hallucination is emotional or toxic based. You need to find out if the individual is using street drugs and/or alcohol. You need to tell him this is extremely dangerous and that a general rule of thumb is that one beer will act like a six-pack. Many individuals turn to illicit drugs/alcohol as a coping mechanism—-the combination of brain disease and drugs/alcohol may cause irreparable harm. Be patient and LISTEN. If asked= point out simply that you are not experiencing the same stimuli. The goal is to guide the person through the experience and let them know What is happening in your environment. DO NOT ARGUE about what is not occurring. When a hallucination occurs, DO NOT leave the individual alone. Be patient and LISTEN. Follow the direction of the individual and help him observe and describe his present and recently past hallucination. You need to find out what the person is seeing, hearing, tasting, touching or smelling to locgin to discover if a pattern exists. Be patient and LlSTEN. Elicit the person's observation of his past hallucinations. This conveys acceptance that will lead to trust. Encourage him to remember when he began experiencing hallucinations. Be patient and LISTEN. (REMEMBER: Hallucinations are symptoms of brain disease. This step is similar to taking a medical history before a physical. It is nearly impossible to understand the present without a clear understanding of the past.) Encourage the individual to observe and describe his thoughts= feelings and actions= both present and past: as they relate to the hallucination. Frequently, individuals with schizophrenia appear to ”turn their symptoms on and off.” Many individuals have teamed how to “survive" this iliness by "covering up" their symptoms to appear normal. It takes tremendous energy and concentration to control the iilness. if you listen for at least l5 minutes the symptoms will generally reappear and the individual will talk about the thought and perceptual distortions and provide clues to the underlying psychosis. Be patient and LISTEN. (REMEMBER: NO ONE IS TO BLAME, but we all share in the responsible management of this illness.) 9. Help the person observe or describe the need or needs underlying the hallucination. 10. ll. Four Core Emotional Needs: (1) Ability to express anger (2) Power and control of our own life (3) Sexuality (4) Self esteem if one or more of these needs are not met for any of as (family members, consumers, providers) we will experience emotional distress. Try to step into the shoes of an individual with brain disease who is already impaired in the ability to accurately interpret reality. Then, add the extra stress of unmet needs. For survival of the self, hallucinations may partially satisfy these unmet needs. Be patient and LISTEN. Help the person see the correlation between the hallucination and the needs it is serving. Focus on the loneliness the individual may be feeling, encourage him to identify when the hallucinations occur and what seems to trigger them. This is a key point. You may want to keep a chart or calendar of when hallucinations occur and how long they last in an effort to identify the trigger. Be patient and LISTEN. Suggest and reinforce the individual's use of increased integersonal relationships in meeting the need. It‘s important to find one person who will serve as an honest, sounding board to help the individual sort out what is real and what isn't. This person must be readily accessible to the individual. Be patient and LISTEN. (REMEMBER: Most interventions in the past have been directed toward the mind. This is directed to the heart. Be confident, calm, concerned and caring. You will help reduce anxiety which is a key step to interrupting the hallucination.) i2. Focus on other and related aspects of the individual’s psychopathological behavior. This means sharing your concerns. Intervention works both ways. When we give ourselves, others will reciprocate. By doing this we bolster self~esteern, diffuse anger, feel more in control of our lives and feel better about ourselves as sexual beings (we are proud of our masculinity or femininity). Be patient and LISTEN. One consumer told me he had a doctor, a nurse and a social worker to help him, but the most helpful person was his LISTENER. (REMEMBER the Circle of Trust. These techniques do work, but you must remember this is a chronic illness. You can expect a cycling course of ups and downs, good days and bad, particularly in the spring and fall.) (REMEMBER Anxiety plays a key role. After implementing those steps you will be better able to identify what the sources of anxiety are for your loved ones or clients.) Schizophrenia is a very devastating disease...and at times of illness, our loved ones and clients need us more than ever. You can iearn to understand a person who has hallucinations. You can help. Give it a try and BE PATIENT. ...
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