l2 - Before we begin Classical relativity Maxwell and...

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Unformatted text preview: Before we begin Classical relativity Maxwell and Einstein Special relativity Lorentz contraction Time dilation Length contraction Comments on lecture notes On Tuesday, I rearranged slides on the fly during the lecture. As a result, the file l1.pdf as it now exists on the course web page is different than the file l1.pdf as it existed before that lecture. I might do this sort of thing quite frequently. Good ways to use the on-line lecture notes: Save yourself the bother of writing down all the equations. Concentrate on discussion rather than transcription. Bad ways to use the on-line lecture notes: Stop coming to class. Youll miss all the discussion and amplification of the notes! Before we begin Classical relativity Maxwell and Einstein Special relativity Lorentz contraction Time dilation Length contraction Feynmans Messenger Lectures Richard Feynman was a co-recipient of the 1965 Nobel Prize in Physics for his role in the development of Quantum Electrodynamics, and gained fame as a physicst, a teacher, and as a colorful character. Thanks to Anthony Tricarichi for pointing out that some of his lectures are now available online: http://research.microsoft.com/apps/tools/tuva/ Before we begin Classical relativity Maxwell and Einstein Special relativity Lorentz contraction Time dilation Length contraction Classical relativity Lets pretend that were in an Airbus A320 that has just landed in the Hudson. Observers on the shore are in frame S 1 , while we on the airplane are in frame S 2 thats moving at a velocity + v in the x direction relative to those on the shore. x 2 x 1 v Before we begin Classical relativity Maxwell and Einstein Special relativity Lorentz contraction Time dilation Length contraction Classical relativity II Again, observers on the shore are in frame S 1 , while we on the airplane are in frame S 2 thats moving at a velocity + v in the x direction relative to those on the shore. Compare shore frame positions ( x 1 , y 1 , z 1 ) with airplane frame positions ( x 2 , y 2 , z 2 ) . The frame S 2 we constrain to lie mainly on the plane. (Apologies to Professor Henry Higgins and Eliza Doolittle in My Fair Lady ) As the airplane floats downriver, we have a simple relationship between x positions in their frame S 1 versus our frame S 2 : x 2 = x 1 vt and y 2 = y 1 and z 2 = z 1 and t 2 = t 1 (1) That is, when we stand on the wing of the airplane, it looks to us like people on shore are moving towards the tail. We also have a simple relationship between velocities in the two frames: v 2 x = v 1 x v and v 2 y = v 1 y and v 2 z = v 1 z (2) Before we begin Classical relativity Maxwell and Einstein Special relativity Lorentz contraction Time dilation Length contraction Measuring a speedy meter stick Galilean relativity: simple addition of velocities....
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This note was uploaded on 05/28/2011 for the course PHY 251 taught by Professor Rijssenbeek during the Fall '01 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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l2 - Before we begin Classical relativity Maxwell and...

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