Chapter11a - Air Masses and Fronts I Air Masses A...

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Air Masses and Fronts – I
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Air Masses A large (thousands of kms) body of air with more or less uniform properties in any horizontal direction at any given latitude Temperature Humidity Next time: fronts – the boundary between two different air masses
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Origin and formation of air masses Source Region: the location where the air mass formed its properties Large, flat areas where the air stays stagnant long enough to take on the characteristics of the underlying surface. Ideal source regions are areas of high pressure Types of sources. Tropical: warm Polar: cold Continental: dry Water (maritime): humid
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Classification of air masses cP continental polar cold, dry, stable cA continental arctic very cold, very dry, stable mP maritime polar cool, moist, unstable mT maritime tropical warm, moist, usually unstable cT continental tropical hot, dry, unstable surface air
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Stability of air masses Which is lighter? Dry air Moist air Dry air: Nitrogen Oxygen Argon Moist air: all this plus H 2 O
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The weight of humid air Mean molecular mass of dry air: Mean molecular mass of wet air. Moist air is lighter and less dense than dry air at the same temperature. Moist air rises more readily. Evaporation enhances convection in the atmosphere. gas
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This note was uploaded on 05/29/2011 for the course MET 1010 taught by Professor Matchev during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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Chapter11a - Air Masses and Fronts I Air Masses A...

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