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Chapter13a - Weather Forecasting I Review of Chapter 12...

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Weather Forecasting - I
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Review of Chapter 12 The polar front model (Norwegian model) of a developing mid-latitude cyclonic storm represents a simplified but useful model of how an ideal storm progresses through the stages of birth, maturity and dissipation. Cyclogenesis, lee-side lows, northeasters, bombs. For a surface mid-latitude cyclonic storm to form, there must be an area of upper-level divergence above the surfacelow . For the surface storm to intensify, this region of upper level divergencemust be greater than surfaceconvergence.
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Another way of looking at it.
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Review of Chapter 12 When the polar-front jet stream develops into a looping wave, it provides an area of upper-level divergencefor the development of surface mid- latitude cyclonic storms.
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Review of Chapter 12 The curving natureof the polar-front jet stream tends to direct surface mid-latitude cyclonic storms northeastward and surface anticyclones southeastward . Skip thesections: Conveyor belt model of mid-latitude cyclones. A developing mid-latitude cyclone: theMarch storm of 1993. Vorticity, divergence, and developing mid-latitude cyclones. Earth vorticity, relativevorticity and absolute vorticity. Putting it all together: a monstrous snowstorm. Polar lows.
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Importance of forecasting: air-travel
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Importance of forecasting
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Importance of forecasting
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Acquisition of Weather Information Surface measurements (surfaceweather stations) Land (morethan 10,000 stations) Ocean (ships, buoys, drifting automatic stations) Upper air data : radiosondes, aircraft, satellites
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Collection and Exchange of Weather Information The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) – UN agency, 175 nations, standardization and exchangeof data.
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  • Spring '08
  • Matchev
  • Weather forecasting, National Weather Service, Severe weather terminology, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Flash flood warning

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