TheTulip

TheTulip - Brittanie Langford Mosaic 2 The Tulip In The Botany of Desire A Plants-Eye View of the World Michael Pollan explores the relationship

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Brittanie Langford Mosaic 2 The Tulip October 11, 2009 In The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-Eye View of the World, Michael Pollan explores the relationship between humans and plants. In telling the stories of the apple, tulip, cannabis, and potato Pollan shows how the human desire’s of sweetness, beauty, intoxication and control have shaped the landscape for plants to thrive… or is it how plants have tricked humans into keeping their species alive? I’ll be examining the story of the Tulip and the human desire of beauty, and how this tale of the tulip led Pollan into the answer of what could possibly be the meaning of life. Pollan introduces the tulip as a flower that for the most part is useless in the realm of human needs. Introduced into Holland in 1634 the tulip was a flower that was revered by the Dutch simply because of its beauty, which would cause chaos among the Dutch at a later time. My initial question was what would make us attracted to something as useless as a flower, in my opinion they grow get picked sit in vases and die. Pollan states that “Psychiatrists regard a patient’s indifference to flowers as being a symptom of clinical depression” which basically means that stable, healthy people should enjoy looking at flowers. I don’t know how I feel about this statement because I don’t particularly think any flower leaves a huge impression on me. In any case, this idea leads into Pollans’ discussion about the beauty of nature. Pollan says that all major societies have had some kind of connection with flowers and beauty, some like the Jews and Christians did not like the connection, but it was made nonetheless. What made flowers so amazing, Pollan points out, is that there were not many things in nature that were beautiful naturally, such as, mountains, forests (people, like Walden and Thoreau, had to make those popular). But what do we gain by being drawn to flowers? In
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This note was uploaded on 05/30/2011 for the course IH 0852 taught by Professor Benin during the Fall '09 term at Temple.

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TheTulip - Brittanie Langford Mosaic 2 The Tulip In The Botany of Desire A Plants-Eye View of the World Michael Pollan explores the relationship

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