Us gov midterm outline.docx - UNIT ONE WHERE DOES THE STATE COME FROM The state is a human organization that monopolizes the legitimate use of

Us gov midterm outline.docx - UNIT ONE WHERE DOES THE STATE...

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UNIT ONE: WHERE DOES THE STATE COME FROM? The state is a human organization that monopolizes the legitimate use of coercion/force over a territory and its inhabitants. WHERE DOES THE STATE COME FROM? TWO THEORIES •POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY •POLITICAL HISTORY 1. THOMAS HOBBES (1588-1679) 2. JOHN LOCKE (1632-1704) 3. JEAN JACQUES ROUSSEAU (1712-1778) CONTRACT THEORY: HOBBES AND LOCKE State of nature is bad= social contract = state. Hobbes= monarchy. Locke= representative democracy. •CONTRACT THEORY: ROUSSEAU State of nature is good= social contract= peaceful state. Rousseau= direct democracy. Political history Roman Empire 450 ce Fall of the roman empire 479ce Aftermath of fall of Rome 500 ce WAR 500 CE – 1200 CE EUROPE 1200 CE WAR 1200 CE - 1648 EUROPE 1648 CE TREATY OF WESTPHALIA 1648 CE EUROPEAN EMPIRES 1700 CE UNIT TWO:
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THE AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL SYSTEM: ORIGINS AND STRUCTURE 7 years war 1756-1763 between england and france. The Seven Years’ War essentially comprised two struggles. One centered on the maritime and colonial conflict between Britain and its Bourbon enemies, France and Spain; the second, on the conflict between Frederick II (the Great) of Prussia and his opponents: Austria, France, Russia, and Sweden. Two other less prominent struggles were also worthy of note. As an ally of Frederick, George II of Britain, as elector of Hanover, resisted French attacks in Germany, initially only with Hanoverian and Hessian troops but from 1758 with the assistance of British forces also. In 1762, Spain, with French support, attacked Britain’s ally Portugal, but, after initial checks, the Portuguese, thanks to British assistance, managed to resist successfully. THIS CAUSED BRITISH WAR DEBT EXPLOSION •PROCLAMATION LINE (1763) •THE SUGAR ACT (1764) Taxed for imported sugar and molasses •THE STAMP ACT (1765) forced to but stamps for every paper item •QUARTERING ACT (1765) must house and feed british soldiers •TOWNSHEND ACTS (1767) taxes in tea paper glass and paintings. THE PROCLAMATION LINE (1763)-- NO MORE WESTWARD EXPANSION
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Colonial protests 1767-1774 Boston tea party 1773 COERCIVE ACTS In Great Britain, these laws were referred to as the Coercive Acts. The acts took away self-governance and historic rights of Massachusetts, triggering outrage and resistance in the Thirteen Colonies . They were key developments in the outbreak of the American Revolution in 1775. Four of the acts were issued in direct response to the Boston Tea Party of December 16, 1773. The British Parliament hoped these punitive measures would, by making an example of Massachusetts, reverse the trend of colonial resistance to parliamentary authority that had begun with the 1764 Sugar Act . A fifth act, the Quebec Act , enlarged the boundaries of what was then the Province of Quebec and instituted reforms generally favorable to the French Catholic inhabitants of the region; although unrelated to the other four Acts, it was passed in the same legislative session and seen by the colonists as one of the Intolerable Acts. The Patriots viewed the acts as an arbitrary violation of the rights of Massachusetts, and in September 1774 they organized the First Continental Congress to coordinate a protest. As
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  • American Revolution, United States Declaration of Independence, Thirteen Colonies, Continental Congress

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