Journal 21

Journal 21 - Throughout Greek myth, love creates...

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As I have started reading the literary work of Ovid , one major difference arises that contrasts itself from other plays and myths that I have read- it is a literary work, only a collection of myths written down from oral tradition. From what we have already read, The Metamorphoses finds themselves in a place contrary to the Greeks for the time being, but eventually in the future of their transgression from oral tradition to written works. However, within them, the underlying meaning of myth can still be found and I would like to focus the attention to the Daughters of Minyas and the story that is told about Thisbe and Pyramus because of their relation to the origins of Greek myth. The first story concerning the love of Pyramus and Thisbes includes a driving force that leads them to commit acts which are so extreme that they end up killing themselves unknowingly of each others future- this force of love.
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Unformatted text preview: Throughout Greek myth, love creates deceitfulness between gods, it turns into hate and creates havoc for families as seen in Medea and just like in Ovid, love menaces the minds of the lovers. This love that menaces can be seen in some of the last words spoken by Thisbe, But I, too, command the force to face at least this task: I can claim love, and it will give me strength enough to strike myself. I even feel that the lioness that destroyed the plan of the lovers can be seen by Jungian as an archetype of this treacherous and deceitfulness of a character used to diverge original plans and create situations that confront people who have to go the extremes relieve the situation. What makes this story so relevant is that it captures what myth used to be by showing how a person orally tells a myth....
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This note was uploaded on 05/31/2011 for the course CLAS 131 taught by Professor James during the Fall '07 term at UNC.

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