RR 2 - 26 January 2007 Is a person more likely to be...

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Unformatted text preview: 26 January 2007 Is a person more likely to be affected by the nocebo effect as a member of a group? What role does social context play? Give 2 examples of this from your reading and/or own experience. This article was quite interesting and even though I have never actually read anything about the nocebo effect, as I read I found direct parallels to everyday life and similar situations seen on the news or read in the news paper. The nocebo effect occurs both in groups and with just individuals as well. This effect seems to differentiate itself with each individual, causing more severe or less severe negative effects depending on the emotional state of each individual and/or the negtive expectations they have (Hahn 138). A good example of this is the study of the patients with some degree of depression and heart disease. The studies find that the patients with depression were more likely to have a fatal or nonfatal heart disease (Hahn 140). As an individual, this phenomenon affects that particular person but within a group setting, the effect is...
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RR 2 - 26 January 2007 Is a person more likely to be...

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