chiral catalysts - Chemistry 3140 Advanced Inorganic...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 5/31/11 Chemistry 3140: Advanced Inorganic Wilkinson’s Catalyst: A look an one catalytic cycle
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5/31/11 We’ve talked about hydrogenation reactions of alkenes and the classic example of organic chemistry implying the presence of catalysts in many reactions, but never actually talking about what they do. We’ve already seen a bit about alkene complexes to transition metals: Often drawn this way: M
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5/31/11 Overall Reaction: R H 2 cat. R Our catalyst: Known as Wilkinson’s Catalyst, this is a classic Rh+1, d8, square planar complex. Remember: catalysts are regenerated. Complexes that make good catalysts are either coordinatively unsaturated (less than octahedral) or have ligands that can readily move or fall off to open up sites, or both. Rh PPh 3 PPh 3 Cl Ph 3 P
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5/31/11 This is the overall cycle. Let’s pick it apart … The first step: the square- planar Rh+1, d8 complex adds a hydrogen to become a Rh+3, d6 octahedral complex.
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Second step: one of
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chiral catalysts - Chemistry 3140 Advanced Inorganic...

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