CJ 101 Syllabus - GRAND VALLEY STATE UNIVERSITY JUSTICE AND...

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GRAND VALLEY STATE UNIVERSITY JUSTICE AND SOCIETY—CJ 101-03 WINTER SEMESTER 2009 INSTRUCTOR: Ed Edwardson DAYS CLASS MEETS: T/TH OFFICE: A-1-138 MAK TIME CLASS MEETS: 4/515 PM OFFICE PHONE: 616-331-7140 LOCATION: 617 EC EMAIL: [email protected] OFFICE HOURS: M/5-6PM (AT MAK) and 1-4:00 pm T/TH (AT DEVOS) I. COURSE DESCRIPTION : This introduction to the study of crime and justice includes theories and methodologies from a variety of social science disciplines. This course also provides an introduction to the study of social control and to the origins of crime at individual, structural, and cultural levels. We will focus on the various stages, practices, and personnel of the criminal justice system. We will examine the problem of crime in American society and society’s response to this issue. All of the major components of our criminal justice system, including police, prosecution, the courts, corrections, and juvenile justice will be discussed from both historical and contemporary perspectives. CJ 101 fulfills Social Sciences Foundation. II. OBJECTIVES : Upon completion of this course, the student will demonstrate a mastery of fundamental knowledge of the criminal justice process, and its interconnectedness to other disciplines, i.e.; history, philosophy, and law. 1. Recognize the ideological, political and philosophical assumptions that support the criminal justice system. 2. Understand the components of the criminal justice system and their interrelationships to the prevention, detection, and control of crime. 3. Identify and understand criminal law, procedures, systems, theories and agents across various historical, social, and political contexts. 4. Students will communicate observations, analyses, and arguments through group interactions, student’s presentations, class participation, and written assignments.
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III. BLOOM’S TAXONONOMY LEVEL AND DOMINANT CURRICULUM “THREADS”: While the current course will draw from
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