Chapter 9 translation

Chapter 9 translation - Chapter 9 Protein Synthesis...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–14. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 9 Protein Synthesis Suggested problems: #1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 11, 15, 16, 19, 20, 22, 27, 32
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Proteins are made of amino acids (also called polypeptides) All amino acids have the following structure
Background image of page 2
There are 20 primary amino acids, all with unique side chains
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Proteins are chains of amino acids -the amino end of one amino acids always links to the carboxyl end of the next. -bond that is formed is a peptide bond (this is a covalent bond) -proteins are polarized : they always have an amino end and a carboxyl end (N-terminus) (C-terminus)
Background image of page 4
Protein Structure (four levels) Complex folding of the secondary structure More than one protein, all folded together.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Protein Secondary Structure
Background image of page 6
Two common types of protein secondary structure
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Genes and proteins are colinear Yanofsky 1963: -made mutations in the trpA gene in E. coli -isolated many “loss of function” mutant alleles -showed by recombination the order in which they occurred in DNA -showed by biochemistry that the order of the mutations was the same in the resulting protein
Background image of page 8
The Genetic Code: Possible ways to specify amino acids Possibilities: 1.2 nucleotides= one amino acid: 16 combinations possible (not enough) 2. 3 nucleotides=one amino acid: 64 combinations possible 3. overlapping: one mutation usually affected only one amino acid, therefore unlikely
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Experiments with suppressors prove a triplet code Francis Crick and Sydney Brenner 1961 (bacteriophage T4) -Made mutants with proflavin, which makes single base pair insertions or deletions -Looked for revertant s of proflavin-induced mutations wild-type: THE FAT CAT ATE THE BIG RAT mutant: THE FAT ATA TET HEB IGR AT revertant: THE FAT ATA ATE THE BIG RAT If the first mutation was a deletion of one base, the revertant always contained an insertion of one base. *Combinations of three single base insertions or three single base deletions restored the wild-type phenotype. proved a triplet code
Background image of page 10
Crick and Brenner suppressor mutation experiment
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Crick and Brenner suppressor mutation experiment
Background image of page 12
Cracking the genetic code (1960s) Discovery of how to make synthetic RNA allowed experiments that led to “cracking the code” 1961 Nirenberg and Matthaei made a synthetic RNA that was translated into a protein:
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 14
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 05/28/2011 for the course BIO 220 taught by Professor Dr.leatherman during the Spring '10 term at N. Colorado.

Page1 / 33

Chapter 9 translation - Chapter 9 Protein Synthesis...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 14. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online