final_prep

final_prep - Paul von Hippel Sociology 549 Practice for...

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Paul von Hippel Sociology 549 Practice for final These problems are intended to help students prepare for the final exam. They require skills similar to those needed for the final. However, you should not expect an exact correspondence between the problems here and the problems on the final proper. Answers are attached. 1. The table below is SPSS output from an analysis of POLVIEWS (political views). The analysis was conducted with three age groups from a subsample of the GSS1998. POLVIEWS is a scale running from 1=extremely liberal to 7=extremely conservative. Respondents were divided into three age groups, 18-29 years, 30-49 years, and 50 years or older. Descriptives THINK OF SELF AS LIBERAL OR CONSERVATIVE 264 3.84 1.321 .081 3.68 4.00 1 7 618 4.05 1.407 .057 3.93 4.16 1 7 474 4.27 1.360 .062 4.15 4.39 1 7 1356 4.08 1.382 .038 4.01 4.16 1 7 18-29 years 30-49 years 50 years or older Total N Mean Std. Deviation Std. Error Lower Bound Upper Bound 95% Confidence Interval for Mean Minimum Maximum a. Review the mean scores for each group. What statement(s) can be made about the relationship between age and political views in the sample? b. Suppose we wanted to test the relationship between age and political views in the US population . Using formal symbols, state the null and research hypotheses. c. Conduct a hypothesis test and interpret the p value. In plain English, what can you conclude about the relationship between age and political views?
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2 2. The table below describes voting behavior in the 1992 Presidential election among a small sample of Hispanic and non-Hispanic persons. Voting in 1992 Presidential Election and Ethnicity Ethnicity Hispanic* Non- Hispanic Voted 4 110 Didn’t vote 10 61 *Hispanic persons may be of any race. Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Statistical Abstract of the United States 1995 (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1995), p. 289. a. Construct a table that gives the percentage of Hispanics and non- Hispanics who did and didn’t vote in 1992. What pattern does the table suggest? b. Construct a 95% confidence interval for the difference between Hispanic and non-Hispanic voting rates. Interpret the interval in an ordinary sentence. Does this interval apply to just the sample, or to the millions of Hispanics and non-Hispanics in the US? c. Suppose you collected this data to test the theory that voting rates are related to ethnicity. State the null and research hypotheses. d. Carry out the hypothesis test that you just set up. Interpret the p value. Interpret the result in two ways: (1) in formal statistical language and (2) in an ordinary sentence that a precinct worker would understand. e. Explain how your hypothesis test agrees with your confidence interval. f. There are actually two ways to carry out the hypothesis test. What are they? In (d) you used one of these techniques; now use the other. That is, repeat the hypothesis test using a different statistical technique. Does your answer agree with the answer you obtained in (d)?
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3. The General Social Survey asks people to self-define their social class as “lower class,” “working class,” “middle class,” or “upper class. ” How does
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final_prep - Paul von Hippel Sociology 549 Practice for...

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