Women in the Ancient Performing Arts

Women in the Ancient Performing Arts - Women in the Ancient...

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Copyright 2006, Sean William Doy Women in the Ancient Performing Arts An Overview
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Copyright 2006, Sean William Doy Major Greco-Roman Performing Arts Dance Music Theater
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Copyright 2006, Sean William Doy Greco-Roman Music Major Characteristics The few extant examples of Greco-Roman musical notation are currently untranslatable, so we have no authentic examples of Greco-Roman music We are aware of certain elements of music theory, types of instruments, and the uses of music
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Copyright 2006, Sean William Doy Greco-Roman Music (continued) Women typically made music in the home rather than in public
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Copyright 2006, Sean William Doy Greco-Roman Music Theory The Greek mathematician and philosopher Pythagoras contributed to music theory by: Identifying differences in pitches using a monochord Developing the notion of the interval, or distance between pitches
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Copyright 2006, Sean William Doy Greco-Roman Music Theory (continued) Pitches were organized into modes (forerunners to our modern scales)
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Copyright 2006, Sean William Doy Greco-Roman Modes Ionian Dorian Phrygian Lydian Mixolydian Aeolian Locrian
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Copyright 2006, Sean William Doy Doctrine of Ethos Music has an ethical affect on the listener, altering not just the listener’s mood, but behavior According to this doctrine, Plato and Aristotle categorized the modes as follows: Dorian – produces strong, warlike feelings; conducive to virtue and representative of the golden mean of music Phrygian – produces sensual feelings Lydian – produces lethargy and laziness
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Copyright 2006, Sean William Doy Greek Musical Instruments String Lyre – small harp played on shoulder or lap. Kithara – larger harp played on lap Lute – plucked instrument with a neck
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Copyright 2006, Sean William Doy Greek Musical Instruments (continued) Wind Aulos (Single and Double) – reed instrument whose pitch is manipulated by opening and closing holes
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Copyright 2006, Sean William Doy Roman Musical Instruments Romans assimilated most of the ancient
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This note was uploaded on 06/01/2011 for the course HUM 120 taught by Professor Seandoyle during the Spring '11 term at Moraine Valley Community College.

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Women in the Ancient Performing Arts - Women in the Ancient...

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