Women_in_18th_through_20th_Century_Philosophy

Women_in_18th_through_20th_Century_Philosophy - Women in 18...

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Unformatted text preview: Women in 18 through th 20 Century Philosophy 20 th An Overview Copyright 2005, Sean William Doyle Copyright Major Philosophical Movements The Enlightenment Romanticism Feminism Copyright 2005, Sean William Doyle Copyright The Enlightenment The 18th century philosophical and cultural movement marked by the application of reason to human problems and affairs, a questioning of traditional beliefs and ideas, and an optimistic faith in unlimited progress for humanity, particularly through education education Copyright 2005, Sean William Doyle Copyright Enlightenment Philosophers Olympe de Gouges (1748-1793 CE) She claimed that women should be She entitled to the same rights and liberties outlined in the Declaration of the Rights of Man Man She was guillotined for treason in 1793 Major Works: Les Droits de la femme (The Rights of Les Woman) Woman) Copyright 2005, Sean William Doyle Copyright Enlightenment Philosophers Enlightenment (continued) (continued) Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797 CE) She claimed that women are as rational as men She and should be treated the same and that women should abandon feminine artifice and cunning, especially the need to be socially pleasing, and through education become equal partners with educated men educated Major Works: A Vindication of the Rights of Woman Copyright 2005, Sean William Doyle Copyright Romanticism An intellectual, artistic, and literary An movement that began in the late 18th movement century as a reaction to Neoclassicism and that stressed the emotional, mysterious, and imaginative side of human behavior and the unruly side of nature nature Copyright 2005, Sean William Doyle Copyright Feminism A philosophical movement that claims that philosophical women are treated as “the Other” and, thus, accorded a different and lower existence than men, society conspires to idealize women and, thus, discourages them from competing with men, and that women should be entitled to the same basic rights and freedoms (intellectual, moral, political, social, etc.) as men Copyright 2005, Sean William Doyle Copyright 19th Century Feminist Philosophers Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902 CE) She was a founder and leader of the American She woman’s rights movement who organized the first woman’s rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York in 1848 New Major Works: The Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments History of Woman Suffrage The Woman’s Bible Copyright 2005, Sean William Doyle Copyright 19th Century Feminist Philosophers (continued) (continued) Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935 CE) She argued for women’s economic She independence as the basis for social progress and claimed that the woman’s traditional roles stifled her growth and her children’s development development Major Works: Women and Economics The Home Concerning Children His Religion and Hers Copyright 2005, Sean William Doyle Copyright 20th Century Feminist Philosophers Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986 CE) She was an influential existentialist, socialist, She and feminist who examined the historical, biological, and social factors that defined and perpetuated women’s status as “other” and drew parallels between the status of women and other oppressed groups oppressed Major Works: The Second Sex Copyright 2005, Sean William Doyle Copyright ...
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This note was uploaded on 06/01/2011 for the course HUM 120 taught by Professor Seandoyle during the Spring '11 term at Moraine Valley Community College.

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